beach

7 Photos that Every Photographer Takes

There are a few photos that every photographer takes in their lifetime. It doesn't matter who you are or where you came from, you've taken these photos or will take them one day in the future. They're mostly tired shots we're all probably best avoiding, yet none of us can. Even having read this, someday you'll catch yourself mid click, snapping off one of these photos.

Yes, much like the proverbial photographic flame to our poor, moth-like eyeballs, these photos have an allure we can't deny. No matter how self-aware or disciplined we are, we'll forever be incapable of escaping the seven photos every photographer takes.

Microscopic Sand Photography Reveals the Breathtaking Beauty Hiding at the Beach

Next time you're at the beach, forget about the sunset or the crashing waves or the light that's reflecting off of the water just so; if you want an amazing photo opportunity, all you have to do is look down at the stuff between your toes.

We're talking, of course, about sand. And if you're thinking that sand isn't exactly photogenic we have a feeling your opinions will change once you feast your eyes on what Dr. Gary Greenberg saw when he put sand grains under the microscope.

Beautiful and Disorienting Photographs of Reflections on Sandy Beaches

Back in June, New York City-based photographer Htet T San visited a number of beaches around The Big Apple, mainly on Coney Island and at Brighton Beach. Her goal was to capture the concept of "the complete nothingness" through reflections of beachgoers seen in the wet sands. The resulting images form a series she calls "The Frail Second."

Sarah Lee Surf Cover Shot

Photographing Surfers Underwater: How Sarah Lee Makes it Happen

We're in the midst of Summer, and if you're one of the many folks who live by coastline, you have access to one of mother nature's most beautiful elements: the ocean. And while the lot of us prefer to purely listen to the waves crash from the comfort of the golden sands, photographer Sarah Lee has been taking her gear into the water and capturing surfers do their thing off the big island of Hawaii.

Having snapped scores of mesmerizing imagery of surfers beneath the waves -- as if they themselves were sea life -- Sarah Lee's art piqued our interest. How does she do it? Surely there's more to bringing your camera into the water and firing away, right?

Photos of Strangers on a Beach, Captured by the Subjects Themselves

Stranger Tourist Self-Portraits is an experimental photo project by photographer Benoit Paillé that consists of photos of strangers encountered on a beach in Mexico. What's different about the series is that the photographs are captured by the subjects themselves, as evidenced by the remote shutter release cable seen approaching the camera from the strangers' hands.

Layers of Light and Time Captured on Single Frames Using a 4×5 Camera

London-based photographer Tony Ellwood has a project called In No Time that deals with our perception and awareness of our passage of time. All the photographs are of the same pier on a beach that Ellwood visited over a period of six months. His technique, which took him 18 months to develop and perfect, involves visiting the location multiple times for each photo -- sometimes up to three times a day for multiple days. Using a 4x5 large format camera, Ellwood creates each exposure across multiple sessions, as if he were doing multiple exposure photography, but of a single subject and scene. Each exposure time ranges from a few seconds to multiple hours.

Surreal Photos of Twisty Ladders on a Misty Beach

One way to shoot surreal photographs is to capture things where they don't ordinarily belong, whether it's glowing cubes in a forest or houses and babies floating in mid-air. Often this type of image is done using photo manipulation, but that's not true of the photos in artist Joy Umali's project titled Ladders. Umali hauled a number of distorted metal ladders onto Rodeo Beach in San Francisco, and then had photographer Walter Kitundu photograph the scene.

World’s Largest Stop Motion Animation

Not satisfied with creating a stop-motion animation of microscopic proportions, Nokia has gone in the opposite direction, this time turning a beach into what Guinness deemed the "world's largest stop motion animation set." The 12-megapixel stills were shot over five days using a Nokia N8 cell phone strapped to a 40 meter high cherry picker, and the largest scene spans a whopping 11,000 square feet!