aperture

A Beginner’s Guide to Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO in Photography

This guide to photographic exposure aims to help you take full control of your camera. I often tell my students that I want them to move away from the idea “taking a photograph” and towards the idea of "making a photograph." I teach them how to take the camera off auto mode and take full control of the settings themselves in order to create the photograph they want.

Depth of Field Explained

When you focus your camera, the area around the focal distance will also be in focus. But this can fall off to blur quickly or slowly. The acceptable amount of in-focus area around what's you are focusing on is called depth of field.

On Shooting at f/0.95 for Wedding Photography

My name is Will Chao, and I'm a wedding photographer based in Melbourne, Australia. I’m a huge fan of large aperture lenses. I shoot every lens almost 100% of the time at the maximum aperture possible. At any given wedding, over 90% of my photos are taken with 35mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.2, and 200mm f/2.0, each at its widest aperture setting. I’m also one of the few people who use f/1.2 and f/1.4 for group shots.

What’s the Fastest Lens Theoretically Possible? And What Would it Look Like?

We've told you about some pretty fast lenses in the past -- from the legendary Zeiss 50mm f/0.7 lenses made for NASA and used by Stanley Kubrick to film a candle light scene, to X-Ray lenses that you can try to Frankenstein onto your camera body for some strange soft-focus results.

But what is the fastest lens that is theoretically possible? And what would that lens look like? Matt Granger answers those exact questions in the interesting technical video above.

Adobe Just Released a Simple and Free Aperture to Lightroom Migration Plugin

If you've been looking to migrate your Aperture library over to Lightroom ever since the official announcement of Aperture's demise, you've had to be content with manually doing it or using one of the unofficial tools that had already been released. But that is no longer the case.

Earlier today, Adobe officially released its own tool: a free Lightroom plugin that will allow you to import your entire Aperture (or iPhoto) library, metadata and all, quickly and easily.

Understanding Aperture: Why Shooting Wide Open Isn’t Always the Best Choice

When you drop hundreds or thousands of dollars on a new piece of fast glass, it’s natural to want to shoot it wide-open until the focusing ring falls off. But, the idea that for all portraits you want to be wide open and for all landscapes you want to be stopped down isn’t true. Here to explain in the above video is photographer Matt Granger.

Free Aperture to Lightroom Migration Tool is in Open Beta

The announcement that Apple is discontinuing Aperture has left many users wondering how they’re supposed to properly transfer their soon-to-be irrelevant file structure over to Adobe's Lightroom.

Neither Adobe nor Apple have yet released an official means to do so (at least not yet), and so software developer Adrian Grah took it into his own hands and created Aperture Exporter: a free utility that automates the process of moving from Aperture to Lightroom 5.

LensRentals Celebrates Independence Day with Some Gratuitous Lens Mutilation

A couple of weeks ago I got an email asking if we would be willing to take some lenses, remove the electronics, fix the aperture wide-open, and permanently lock them at infinity focus. It seems the person who needed this done was having trouble finding a legitimate repair shop or service center that was willing to do it.

Well, illegitimate is our specialty, so I started negotiations about just how exorbitant a fee we would charge for this work. We quickly arrived at a fair price (no money, but we get to take pictures) and yesterday received brand new copies of the Canon 100mm f/2 and Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art to work on. If you’re the kind of person who slows down to view car wrecks or spent $200 on fireworks for the 4th of July holiday, you might like this.

Breaking: Apple Officially Kills Off Aperture

The day has come. We all felt it in our bones, but today it has been confirmed by the guys in Cupertino: Apple has stopped development of Aperture, its professional-level photo organization and editing software.

New Chemical Iris Technology May Change the Way Smartphone Apertures Work

As smartphones have gotten smaller and smaller, the need for the cameras inside of them to shrink has become more pressing. One area where there's a lot of room for improvement is in the traditional mechanical aperture.

As we begin to hit the physical limit of the overlapping blades, researchers at the University of Kaiserslautern have designed an exciting new ‘micro iris’ that uses small chemical rings rather than a physical blades, dramatically shrinking the size of the aperture components in the camera.

6 Things You Don’t Know About Apertures, But Probably Should

One of the first things that we learn when we start taking photographs seriously is that ‘aperture’, the size of the hole in the lens through which light passes, controls depth of field.

A large aperture creates shallow depth of field while a narrow one creates wide depth of field. But there’s a little more to aperture than that, let’s take a closer look at this most fundamental photographic control.

Back to Basics: Short Walkthrough Covers the Exposure Triangle for Beginners

When you're first learning the basics of photography, one of the first things you find out about after dropping out of 'auto' is the exposure triangle.

Consisting of shutter speed, aperture, and ISO, the exposure triangle is a system that takes into account each of those variables, making exposure adjustments a breeze when you need to change one of the variables for a particular situation (say, freezing motion or achieving a shallow depth of field).

Tutorial: Short, Sweet Workflow for Editing Street Photography in Lightroom 5

When it comes to street photography, much of the aesthetic appeal is the limited editing that usually takes place (or doesn’t take place, I guess), leaving the story and subject the focus of the image instead of creative editing. But that's not to say that editing should be left out of the equation or completely disregarded.

If you're wondering where that line should sit, this tutorial by Swiss street photographer Thomas Leuthard shows you what he does when he imports his street photos into Lightroom 5.