anseladams

Untold Stories About Ansel Adams’ Portraits and Workshops

Jeanne Adams is the daughter-in-law of the late and great landscape photographer Ansel Adams, and she served as the head of the Ansel Adams Gallery for 25 years. In the 10-minute interview above, Jeanne talks to Marc Silber of Advancing Your Photography about Ansel's workshops, teaching styles, and lesser-known portraits.

A Tour of Ansel Adams’ Custom-Built Darkroom

"Dodging and burning are steps to take care of mistakes God made in establishing tonal relationships." That quote by the great Ansel Adams might contain a hint of joke, but it's no joke that Adams sometimes spent entire days locked up in his darkroom creating his prints. And now we get to see the space for ourselves.

NPR Interviews the National Park Service on Its ‘Next Ansel Adams’ Search

We reported last December that the National Park Service photography program had posted a new job listing for a full-time photographer to document the country's natural landscapes -- the same position once held by legendary photographer Ansel Adams.

With the application window now closed, Rich O'Connor of the Park Service was just interviewed on NPR's All Things Considered about the position. You can listen to the 4.5-minute interview above.

‘Ansel Adams’ Job Opening in US Govt Pays ~$100,000 Per Year

In 1941, legendary photographer Ansel Adams began working for the US Department of the Interior to shoot large format photos of National Parks and other notable locations out in the great outdoors.

Guess what? The same job opening has appeared again: the National Parks Service is looking to hire a black-and-white large format photographer, and the salary is up to $100,000 per year.

Ansel Adams’ Pictures of an American Relocation Camp During WWII

Ansel Adams is best known for his breathtaking landscape photos, but he photographed much more than nature during his decades-long career. In 1943, already the best-known American photographer, Adams visited the Manzanar War Relocation Center in California, one of the relocation camps the US gathered Japanese-Americans into during World War II.

Iconic Photographers Posed for These Baseball Cards in 1974

Back in 1974, photographer Mike Mandel traveled across the United States and photographed 134 top photographers and curators as baseball players. Mandel then used those portraits to create Baseball-Photographer Trading Cards, an unusual set of trading cards featuring big names in the industry. As you can see from the card above, Ansel Adams was one of them.

10 of the Most Collectable Photo Books of All Time

Online book marketplace AbeBooks -- probably the first link you'll see if you try to search for a rare, signed or early edition of your favorite novel or photo book -- has a list of the 10 most collectable photography books of all time. You can probably guess two or three of them, but do you think you know them all?

Print Scam? There is More Than Meets the Eye at the Ansel Adams Gallery

Ansel Adams is one of the most famous landscape photographers known around the world. He is best known for countless, perfectly balanced black and white images of the Yosemite Valley, Glacier National Park, Yellowstone, and many more iconic national parks and landscapes throughout America. He set the standard of landscape photography presented as fine art to this very day.

Ansel Adams’s Arca Swiss 4×5 Camera Set to Be Auctioned Off Next Month

It’s not often a piece of photographic history as important as this goes up for auction. What you see above is the Arca Swiss 4x5 camera that Ansel Adams used between 1964 and 1968. Set to be auctioned off with a plethora of old Leicas by Revival Auction Company, this item is very highly regarded because it may be the first of Ansel Adams cameras to be auctioned off.

Ansel Adams Prints Found Sitting in a Box in a UC Berkeley Library

UC Berkeley's library system is the fourth largest library in the United States, so it's no wonder that treasures are often forgotten and buried inside the rare collections. Case in point: a massive collection of signed prints by Ansel Adams have been discovered in one of the 32 libraries, just sitting around in a box.

A 1958 Documentary About the Life and Work of Photographer Ansel Adams

If you have a free 20 minutes, here's a great 1958 documentary on the life and work of iconic landscape photographer Ansel Adams. Created while Adams was living at a house near the Golden Gate Bridge, the film provides a look into his home, interests, attitudes toward art, camera equipment, and photographic techniques.

A Tour of Ansel Adams’ Darkroom

Here's a rare behind-the-scenes look into Ansel Adams' home in Carmel, California and the custom built darkroom in which most of Adams' famous prints were created. It's pretty amazing how much editing Adams' did in transforming the plain negatives into the beautiful works of art hanging on walls around the world.

Legal Rumble Over Alleged Ansel Adams “Lost Negatives” Ends with Settlement

A huge story last year was when a painter named Rick Norsigian came across 65 glass negatives at a garage sale, purchasing them for $45. He then had them examined by experts, who told him that they were previously undiscovered Ansel Adams photographs worth at least $200 million. Just as the find was being heralded as one of the greatest in art history, Ansel Adams' relatives and Publishing Rights Trust expressed skepticism that they were in fact Adams'. It then came to light that the photos might actually belong to a man named Earl Brooks who once lived in the same city as Norsigian (Fresno, California).

Ansel Adams Garage Sale Mystery Apparently Solved

The mystery of the Ansel Adams garage sale negatives keeps taking on new twists, but the latest twist might have solved it once and for all.

KTVU in Oakland is reporting that a Bay Area woman named Mariam l. Walton has come forward with apparently solid proof that the photographs were not taken by Ansel Adams but her Uncle Earl. She was watching KTVU report on the story Tuesday when she suddenly saw a photograph of the Jeffrey Pine on Sentinal Dome and recognized it as a print her uncle Earl Brooks made back in 1923.