airlines

Aerial Photos of Grounded Jets Across the USA

"I shouldn’t be here." That’s all I could think as I brought my camera to my eye to frame a shot overlooking the massive expanse of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. I was in a Robinson R44 Raven II helicopter, the door removed at my request. The sun had barely risen over the north Texas landscape as we approached what is typically one of the busiest airports in the world.

PSA: Never Pack Spare Lithium Batteries in Checked Baggage When Flying

The FAA has published a new warning about the danger of storing spare lithium batteries in checked bags. The batteries, which are widely used in the photography industry to power things like cameras and lighting equipment, "present a risk of both igniting and fueling fires in aircraft cargo/baggage compartments," the FAA says.

Pro Tip: Some Airlines Have a Special Luggage Allowance for Media So You Can Pack More Gear

If you've ever shot on-location somewhere far away, you probably had to make this tough decision: what gear do I take and what do I leave at the studio? For big photo shoots you'd rather err on the side of caution and take it all, but airline luggage allowances make that impossible... or do they?

It turns out that some airlines have a special policy that allows media professionals to pack a whole lot more gear.

FAA Changes Regulations, Will Let People Use Cameras During Takeoff and Landing

For as long as most of us can remember, the pre-takeoff safety briefing given in airplanes worldwide always included something to the effect of "all electronics must be turned off and stowed during takeoff and landing." For photographers, that meant lost photo opportunities unless you were willing to break the rules to get a great shot.

Well, no more. The FAA has reconsidered those rules, which means photographers and other gadget users will be welcome to whip out and use whatever electronic devices they have on hand during the entire flight starting very soon.

Some Airlines Saying ‘No’ to Onboard Photography

Most people in today's society have a mobile phone. Most mobile phones have cameras. Anyone and everyone has become an on-the-scene photojournalist, reporting on everything from major news events to the odd and crazy.

Some of these picture-worthy events take place on everyday flights. Shutter-happy passengers, snapping or even video recording the woman on the next aisle over acting unusual or a fellow passenger being disruptive. It's undeniable that we are curious beings, and want to document and share events we witness. But not everyone is pleased citizen photojournalists.