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5 Myths Photographers Will Tell You About Film, or: Why Film Isn’t Afraid of the Dark

You will be hard pressed to find a reasonable working photographer today, who won't admit that film still has a place in photography and really offers some unique characteristics, even if they choose to not use it. But often photographers who love shooting digital and don't want to deal with film attempt to write off and make excuses for why they can't shoot film. I'd like to offer a rebuttal to such excuses, inspired by a recent thoughtful PetaPixel post.

A Practical Guide to Creating Superresolution Photos with Photoshop

We’ve seen it in plenty of thriller/crime solver TV shows and movies: upon reviewing some grainy and very low-resolution surveillance footage, someone inevitably asks the technician, “can you zoom in on that and enhance it?” Then, with the quick press of a few masterfully placed keystrokes and bleepy computer sounds, the image is suddenly enhanced with vastly increased resolution and a key plot device is revealed.

How to Do Levitation Photography: A Tutorial

As a part of a personal 50/50 project (a photo a day for 50 days with a 50mm lens), I tried my first attempts at levitation photography and had a lot of fun doing it. This tutorial will walk you through the best methods to make a surreal levitation portrait; only a pinch of magic required.

Tutorial: How to Capture a Motion Time-Lapse of the Milky Way from Start to Finish

Ian Norman, the astrophotographer behind Lonely Speck, is a good friend of the blog and an incredibly generous photographers when it comes to sharing his years worth of expertise with the world.

His latest video tutorial is no exception, as Norman shows you, step-by-step, how to create a beautiful motion time-lapse sequence of the Milky Way inching its way across the night sky.

It’s Official: A.I.s are Now Re-Writing History

The other day I created a Google+ album of photos from our holiday in France. Google’s AutoAwesome algorithms applied some nice Instagram-like filters to some of them, and sent me emails to let me have a look at the results. But there was one AutoAwesome that I found peculiar. It was this one, labeled with the word “Smile!” in the corner, surrounded by little sparkle symbols.

It’s a nice picture, a sweet moment with my wife, taken by my father-in-law, in a Normandy bistro. There’s only one problem with it. This moment never happened.

7 Questions with Urban Landscape Photographer Marcus Lyon

Marcus Lyon (b.1965) is a British artist. He studied Political Science at Leeds and Leadership at Harvard Business School. His began his career with Amnesty International, working on commissions concerning street children in Latin America, Africa and Asia. He has an international reputation as a conceptual landscape and portrait artist. His work is collected by many significant private and public institutions and exhibited globally by amongst others the Saatchi Gallery and the MAM Rio.

Video: Tutorial Shows You Exactly How to Capture the Milky Way in Heavy Light Pollution

A couple of days ago, we republished a short tutorial by talented photographer Justin Ng that explained how he uses the Expose To The Right (ETTR) method to capture milky way photos in the heavy light pollution of Singapore.

But if you'd like a more detailed, video run through, this tutorial by astrophotographer Ian Norman -- whose Sony a7S Astrophotography Review, incidentally, appeared on PetaPixel yesterday -- shows you exactly how to adjust your images to get the perfect results.

The Last of The Liberators: D-Day Veterans Photographed in the Locations where They Fought

It might be a few days after the 70th anniversary of the D-Day Invasions of Normandy, but in no way does the belated delivery of this powerful photo series diminish its impact.

Photographed by Robin Savage, The Last of The Liberators is a collection of portraits of the last British D-Day veterans. But what makes these portraits special isn't just the people photographed, but they places they were photographed in.

Have Camera, Will Travel: Fifty Awesome Photo Workshops Around the World

You could go alone to New Zealand, Mexico, Cuba, or wherever your wanderlust takes you, and bring your camera along for the trip -- hope to stumble upon the ‘photographic’ spots, and take some pictures you think might be good.

Or, you could sign up for an amazing, fully immersive photography workshop in an exotic locale with a pro photographer who knows the land, guides you to all the best spots, gives you feedback during critiques, and helps you edit your new travel portfolio along the way. We prefer the latter -- and after finding out about all the amazing photography courses happening all over the world this year, we had to share. Wherever and whatever your heart desires to go and photograph, there’s probably a workshop to guide you through it.

Lewis Hine’s Photography and The End of Child Labor in the United States

It's hard to imagine it, but in the early 1900s, child labor was still extremely common in the United States. All across the nation children would spend their days slaving away in mines and cotton mills, far away from the school rooms that the National Child Labor Committee wanted them to be in.

The NCLC had been trying to put a stop to child labor since it was founded in 1904, but statistics weren't having the effect they had hoped. So, in 1908, they decided to enlist the help of Lewis Hine and his camera to get their message out.

Friday Morning in Strobe Alley

“Ya wanna see Edgerton’s lab?”

Now, asking a photographer if he would like to see the workspace of the guy who made all those iconic stop-action images of impossibly fast-moving objects was like asking a short-order cook if he’d like to see where they invented the ham and cheese omelet.

This Gigantic Tintype Camera Shoots the Analog Equivalent of Gigapixel Photos

Gigapixel photography is all the rage these days, as photographers all over the world compete to hold the record for "world's largest photo," but one photographer in San Francisco is participating in a very different way.

Michael Shindler, a photographer at the tintype studio Photobooth, has built a custom giant tintype camera that shoots portraits that are the analog equivalent of a gigapixel photo.

Review: Leica X Vario Defies Naysayers with Impressive Optics

How should I describe the Leica X Vario? It's as if Leica engineers met at the cafeteria and decided Fuji wasn’t kicking their a** hard enough with the X100/X100s. “Hey, let’s challenge the Fuji XE-1 with a new camera. We will up the ante this time… let’s be double the price of Fuji, AND we will not have interchangeable lens!” Guffaws exploded across the cafeteria as the engineers outlined more specifications to make life living hell for the Leica sales team.

Browse Through a 160,000 Photo Archive of Finland During WWII

In the past, we've shared several online archives that give you access to a huge number of historical and historically significant photos online.

PhotosNormandie offered up 3,000+ CC photos from WWII, the NYC Department of Records compiled a database of over 870,000 photos of "the greatest city on earth," and now the Finnish Defense Forces have put up an online archive of their own, showcasing almost 160,000 wartime photos from Finland during WWII.

Photos of Modern Day Locations Blended with Shots of Major Historical Events

In 2010, photographer Seth Taras created a series of photographs for a worldwide marketing campaign for the History Channel with the message "Know Where You Stand." The photographer shot photos at locations around the world where major historical events happened, and then blended old photos showing those events from the same perspective. It's the same "then and now" concept that has become quite popular over the past few years.