Search Results for: Hubble

This is How Scientists Colorize Hubble Photos of Deep Space

Every mind-blowing deep space photograph captured by the Hubble space telescope that you've ever seen started out black-and-white. So how do we get those amazing technicolor images of the Pillars of Creation or the Bubble Nebula? This short video explains how scientists manage this feat.

Zooming Into NASA’s Hubble Photos to See the Lagoon Nebula Up Close

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope was deployed on April 25, 1990, so this week marked the 28th anniversary of the telescope providing humankind with breathtaking photos of deep space. To celebrate, NASA released this 30-second video that zooms into the Milky Way's central bulge to a new photo just released of the Lagoon Nebula over 4,000 light years away.

Giant Bubble Nebula Captured by the Hubble Telescope

Earlier this year, to celebrate the 26th birthday of its Hubble Space Telescope, NASA shot and published this gorgeous photo of the Bubble Nebula, which has a balloon-like bubble that's expanding in space from a super-hot, massive star that's 45 times more massive than our Sun. The image shows the bubble with never-before-seen clarity.

Hubble Celebrates 26th Birthday with Stunning Shot of the Bubble Nebula

Sigh. There's nothing like a photo straight from the great Hubble Space Telescope to put our megapixel squabbling and ultra-fast frame rate comparisons in perspective. For the telescope's 26th birthday on April 24th, the Hubble engineers have released a spectacular photo of "an enormous bubble being blown into space by a super-hot, massive star."

Iconic Space Photos Are Actually B&W: Here’s How NASA Colorizes Hubble Shots

Did you know that the Hubble Space Telescope is only able to capture black-and-white photos? In order to capture a maximum amount of information in their space photos, NASA captures multiple black-and-white images using different filters in the camera. These images are then combined in post to create the iconic color photographs that you see published by the space agency.

The video above shows how NASA goes about colorizing the photos by compositing the individual shots.

A Close-Up Hubble Photo of the Rare Triple Transit of Jupiter’s Moons

On January 23rd, 2015, there was a rare triple transit of Jupiter's moons, during which observers here on Earth were treated with the sight of three moons crossing the face of the planet at the same time. This event happens only once or twice every ten years.

The Hubble Space Telescope was pointed at Jupiter during the triple transit and captured the beautiful photo above. It shows, from left to right, Europa, Callisto, and Io.

NASA Recreates the Iconic ‘Pillars of Creation’ Hubble Photo 20 Years Later

On April 1st, 1995, the Hubble Telescope captured a photograph that became one of the most iconic space photos ever captured. Titled, "Pillars of Creation," the image shows the gigantic columns of interstellar gas and dust of the Eagle Nebula 6,000 light years away.

Now, 20 years after that image was created, scientists have recreated that image using the same space telescope (shown above).

NASA Zooms Into Stunning Hubble Photo to Show You a Galaxy that’s Falling Apart

There's nothing like a Hubble Space Telescope image to break up all of the law and stock photography-related news (and there has been a LOT in the last 24 hours). Then again, this video and image aren't the most peaceful NASA has ever released, given they show a galaxy tearing itself apart as it hurtles through a particularly harsh part of our universe.

Spectacular Horsehead Nebula Photograph Almost Good Enough to Rival Hubble

Photography is hardly a cheap hobby to pick up, but even within photography, some branches are more expensive than others. And ranking pretty close to the 'most expensive' side of that line is astrophotography... at least the kind that will yield incredible photos like the one you see here by photographer Mike Hankey.

Amateur Astrophotographers and Hubble Tag Team to Create Galaxy Photo

The space agencies that run the Hubble Space Telescope may have some of the most powerful photographic equipment at their disposal, but every now and then they can still use a little help from amateur astrophotographers.

Amateur astrophotographer Robert Gendler created the beautiful photograph above showing the spiral galaxy M106 by compositing existing imagery captured by the Hubble telescope with his own photos captured from Earth.