Tips

 

Protip: Perfectly Synchronize the Clocks on Multiple Cameras Using a Computer

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If you’ve ever needed to deal with photos shot with multiple cameras at the same event, you’ve probably found how important the clocks on the cameras are for keeping the resulting photos neat and orderly. If timestamps are off, then figuring out when photos were captured in relation to each other can be a pain.

One way you can make sure the clocks on your cameras are perfectly synchronized is by automatically synchronizing them to your computer.
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external Printing With Digital Negatives —The Online Photographer

Photographer Carl Weese, expert in making platinum/palladium prints, goes into great technical detail on creating prints with digital negatives.

 
Sep 16, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Pro Tip: How to Wrap Cables with Duct Tape Without Getting Them Sticky

Keeps it secure without leaving it sticky when you take it off. - Imgur

Duct tape can often be a photographer’s best friend. Cable management can often be a nightmare. The two don’t naturally combine very well though, since duct tape can leave sticky reside on your cords after its removed.

If you ever need to wrap up cables and don’t have any twist- or zip-ties on hand, here’s how you can use duct tape to wrap cables without the cables getting sticky.
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Thoughts on Judging an International Wedding Photography Competition

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I had the honor of getting to judge a recent international wedding photography contest for Fearless Photographers, a great organization I’ve been a part of for the last few years. Fearless contests run several times a year and typically receive thousands (if not tens of thousands) of entries from around the world. There is no quota to meet for Fearless judges, so if an image is awesome, it gets an award. The judging is incredibly selective, and seems to get more selective with each round.
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5 Business Mistakes Photographers Make and What You Can Do About Them

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Why do some professional photographers fail to make it in business?

If you can’t cut it technically or artistically as a photographer, then clearly your photography business will have a very limited lifespan. But there are other ways in which you can take your eyes off the ball when turning pro. Here are some classic examples of failure that are easy to avoid when you know how… Read more…

35mm or 50mm: Deciding On Your First Prime

In one of those rare more-informative-than-funny Top Gear DigitalRev episodes, Kai tries to help beginners decide what they should buy for their first prime: a nifty 50mm, or a more versatile 35mm. Read more…

PSA: Declare Your Lithium Ion Batteries or You Might Set Your Plane on Fire

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An Australian man learned earlier this year that just because you’ve disassembled your drone and packed it safely away in a number of Pelican cases, it doesn’t mean it can’t cause troubles when undeclared in the cargo bay of your international flight.

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Battle of the Client Galleries: Comparing 11 of The Best Tools for Proofing and Presentation

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Online client galleries have been there for some time now, but many photographers either neglect this powerful tool relying on ol’ school DVDs and USB drives for image delivery, or simply are not aware of the options that would suit their particular business.

As a beginner, mostly part-time, photographer I was looking for an affordable photo gallery service to give a try. The main problems I wanted such a tool to solve were: a) deliver images quickly after the shoot; b) impress my clients with a personalized website and thus, make them want to refer me; c) make it easy to share the photos. Read more…

external Analyzing Light – How To Breakdown The Lighting Of A Photo —DIY Photography

Understanding lighting can make huge improvements on a photographer’s work. This articles shares a few tips to look out for when analyzing lighting in various portraits.

 
Sep 07, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

external Choosing Lights —Strobist

Because big lights and small lights each bring a different set of considerations to the party, I am splitting my recommendations into speedlights and “studio lights.” (Although I hate that term.)

For speedlights, you have to decide if you wanna drive stick or automatic—AKA manual or TTL. I live in manual mode, which means I sacrifice some convenience for reliability and repeatability. It also means I can pay about a third as much for each of my flashes.

If you live by TTL, you will die by TTL. Or, at least your wallet will die a small, unnecessary death every time you need to purchase a flash.

 
Sep 02, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »