Law

 

DEA Uses Pictures on Woman’s Seized Phone to Set Up Fake Facebook Account for Drug Bust

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The US Drug Enforcement Administration and one of its agents, Timothy Sinnigen, are being sued by a woman who claims they used the photos on a seized phone of hers to hijack her identity and create a fake Facebook profile though which they hoped to bust an alleged New York drug ring. Read more…

Leading New Zealand Tech Retailer Uses iStock Image in Facebook Ad, Forgets to Remove Watermark

Update: The company has responded to our request for comment and fixed the issue. See full update at the bottom.


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Dick Smith is a leading tech retailer in both New Zealand and Australia, but as an anonymous reader showed us this morning, they might have goofed up in a big way in a recent ad they posted on their Dick Smith NZ Facebook page.

As you can see from the screenshot above, they seem to have ‘appropriated’ an iStock image as the background… without even taking the time to remove the watermark. Read more…

Is Etsy the New Silk Road for Copyright Infringement?

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While browsing through my image search results on PIXSY (a new service that finds and invoices image theft for you), I was surprised to see my picture for sale on Etsy (above). My immediate reaction:

  1. What an ugly mousepad. I’d never print my photo like this.
  2. The seller seems to be stealing thousands of photos. How could Etsy let this happen?
  3. Who had the nerve to think they could do this?

So my picture was the party and I wasn’t invited. I decided to see what I could do to notify the seller and contact Etsy about the problem. Read more…

Man Arrested and Charged After Allegedly Shooting Down a Camera Drone with a Shotgun

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A New Jersey resident was arrested last Friday after allegedly firing a shotgun at and successfully hitting a drone that was taking photographs of a nearby home undergoing some renovations. Read more…

external Fair Use for the Rich and Fabulous? —University of Chicago Law Review

Why does a substantial reworking of Catcher in the Rye interfere with J.D. Salinger’s “right not to authorize derivative works” while Patrick Cariou’s photographs are the “raw material” for the “well-known appropriation artist” Richard Prince?

Is a use fair only if Anna Wintour, Brad Pitt, and Beyoncé are there to see it? We recognize that courts must have a means of distinguishing “transformative” uses from “market substitutes,” but in doing so we hope that courts do not convert the right to rework, comment on, or otherwise engage with creative works into a privilege largely reserved for the rich and famous.

 
Oct 01, 2014 · ↬ Via · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Man Fined $3,200 for Crashing His Camera Drone Into the World’s Third Largest Hot Spring

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Ever wonder what it would cost you to run afoul of Yellowstone’s anti-camera drone rules? There’s probably not a chart hanging up anywhere, but if you’re a Dutch tourist and you crash a DJI Phantom into the Grand Prismatic Spring — the world’s third largest hot spring — the bill will come out to $3,200+. Read more…

Texas ‘Anti-Upskirting Law’ Struck Down in Court Thanks to Vague Wording

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If you’ve been following photography news — and given you’re reading this we’d say there’s a good chance that’s the case — you’ve probably heard something along the lines of “Texas just legalized upskirting photography!” And while that’s not entirely untrue, the facts are a bit less sensational. Read more…

external Photographers Settle Copyright Suit Against Google. But On What Terms? —PDN

Under the terms of the settlement, NPPA says, Google admits no liability. And with no mention by plaintiffs about how a revenue stream from the Google Books program will be shared with visual artists going forward, it seems unlikely that today’s settlement included any concessions from Google to pay license fees for images scanned as part of its program.

 
Sep 12, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Photographer Sues Rod Stewart for $2.5M for Recreating Her Photo of the Back of His Head

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We’ve heard of many lawsuits where an artist outright steals an image from a photographer — that can get pretty ugly — but what about an artist hiring another photographer to recreate an image that is pretty much identical to the one they wanted to use, but weren’t allowed to?

That’s the crux of a lawsuit between celebrity photographer Bonnie Schiffman and musician Rod Stewart, who, it seems, recreated an iconic photograph of Schiffman’s after she refused to let the artist use it. Read more…

Legal Battle Threatens to Pull Vivian Maier’s Work from the Public Eye for Years

It’s not unreasonable to expect that almost every person reading this has seen ‘nanny photographer’ Vivian Maier‘s work. Whether in galleries, online or in the much-talked-about documentary ‘Finding Vivian Maier,’ her photos have now made their way around the world many times over and she has been named one of the greats of 20th century photography.

But if you hold a deep appreciation for Maier’s work, we suggest you get your fill while you can, because a legal battle is threatening (and, in fact, succeeding) to pull Maier’s work from the public eye… potentially for years. Read more…