Inspiration

 

Photographers Ignite: 5-Minute Presentations in 20 Rapid-Fire Slides

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An ignite is a type of event in which presenters are given 5 minutes to talk about a subject in just 20 slides. Each slide is shown for only 15 seconds before the slideshow is automatically advanced. It’s a rapid fire of learning and inspiration that has the motto: “Enlighten us, but make it quick!”

In 2010, photographer Kevin Kubota launched a Photographers Ignite event at WPPI, and the show has since become a staple of the expo.
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Portraits of People and Their Essential Everyday Items

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How much can you tell about a person from the small items they carry around every day? Do they provide a more comprehensive picture of who a person is? Atlanta photographer Jason Travis explores this question in his project Persona.

It’s a series of diptych in which the top half of each image is a portrait of a subject, and the bottom half is a photo of that person’s essential everyday items.
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A Photo of the Starry Night Sky From Inside a Tent

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Photographer Mark Gee shot this photograph of the night sky while camping in the great outdoors in New Zealand. It’s a view of what his camera was able to see while looking up through Gee’s tiny tent with the outer flysheet removed. You can find more of his gorgeous night sky shots in his 500px account.

Multiple Camera Drones Were Lost for This Imagery of a Volcano’s Insides

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Explorer Sam Cossman recently employed the help of multiple drones to capture photos and footage of the Marum Crater in an active volcano on the Pacific island nation of Vanuatu. He ended up losing multiple drones in the process, but he left the island with spectacular images that will help provide a better understanding of the volcano and the life that exists around it.
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Shooting Portraits of Superheroes on the Corner of a 1,000-Foot Skyscraper

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Photographer Benjamin Von Wong wanted to capture the fearlessness of superheroes without the use of a green screen or cheap special effects, so he recruited some ordinary people, dressed them up as well-known comic characters, and placed them on the edge of certain death.

The portraits he captured shows the models standing on the corner of a tall skyscraper in San Francisco.
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Mark Seliger’s Portraits of Hollywood Celebrities From the 2015 Oscar Party

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After the Academy Awards this past weekend, the winners attended a Vanity Fair Oscar Party, where they passed through an instant portrait studio set up by photographer Mark Seliger, Vanity Fair, and Instagram.
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Annie Leibovitz Discusses Her Life, Work and Passion on an Exhibition Tour

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Back in 2008, the team over at Advancing Your Photography were invited to an exclusive gallery tour of Annie Leibovitz’s best photographs — an event led by Leibovitz herself. Those in attendance were treated to the photographer sharing about her life and work, and the intersection of those two worlds.
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Lightroom Iron Chef: 29 Submitted Photos Processed Live In Front of a Crowd

Photographer Stu Maschwitz of Prolost recently paid a visit to the Bay Area Lightroom User Group and tried something he’s always wanted to do: Lightroom Iron Chef.

He took 29 audience-submitted photographs and post-processed them in Lightroom in front of a live audience of more than 100 people, all while providing a running commentary of what he’s doing and why.
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Shooting Self-Portraits Under the Northern Lights

If you’ve always dreamed of taking pictures of the northern lights, the video above will give you a small taste of what it’s like. Swedish astrophotographer G├Âran Strand captured the behind-the-scenes footage recently when he drove out into the wilderness in the dead of night to chase auroras.
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Photographer Joe Rosenthal Shares the Story Behind ‘Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima’

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70 years ago today, photographer Joe Rosenthal captured a photograph of six US soldiers raising a flag on Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima in World War II. That photo (shown above), became an instant iconic image — these days we would say it “went viral” — and was published in thousands of publications around the world.

It went on to became the only photo to win a Pulitzer Prize in the same year it was published, and the image is now one of the most republished and recognizable photos of all time.
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