Editorial

 

external Race Seen Through Viewfinders —NY Times

To describe Thomas Allen Harris’s “Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People” as a history of African-American photography would be accurate but incomplete. Inspired by the book “Reflections in Black” (2000), Deborah Willis’s groundbreaking and thorough excavation of a vital and neglected photographic tradition, Mr. Harris’s film is a family memoir, a tribute to unsung artists and a lyrical, at times heartbroken, meditation on imagery and identity.

 
Aug 27, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Please Don’t Be the One to Get Drones Banned

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Photography drones are facing a perilous atmosphere of distrust and legal chaos. In these circumstances, even small mistakes can have big consequences. A shift in public sentiment against private drone usage could easily result in the application of restrictive regulations, or perhaps even conditional bans. Read more…

external On Publishing Photos of a Public Execution by Hamas Fighters —BagNews

As we’ve been asking in instance after instance over many months now, where is the line between news and propaganda? Between reporting and enabling? Between editorial responsibility and corporate self-interest when it comes to publishing such material?

 
Aug 27, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Approaching the Problem of Style

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To do a dangerous thing with style is what I call art.

~ Charles Bukowski

Easier said than done, I think. Good, actionable advice on how to develop your photographic style is hard to find. Clichés, on the other hand, sprout like lawn weeds everywhere: “Style develops over time; you can’t rush it!”, “Confidence creates style!”, “Imitate other people’s work and put a twist on it!”, “Here are 3 ways/8 ways/10 tips to creating style!”
Read more…

external Why I Love My Leica —The Guardian

From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Annie Leibovitz, many of the 20th century’s most defining images were shot on a Leica. [The Guardian's] technology columnist, a lifelong fan, tells the story of the camera that almost died and was triumphantly reborn in the digital age.

 
Aug 25, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · 2 Comments »

A Retinal Neuroscientist’s Rebuttal: Why Humans Can’t See Near Infrared, No Matter What They Eat

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One of the more interesting stories we ran across this weekend was an initial update from a small group of scientists who claim to have successfully extended human vision into near infrared. Their data seems to show that they have, indeed, managed to do this simply by altering their subjects’ diet by restricting vitamin A1 and supplementing with A2 in order to create a certain protein complex. You can read more about this here.

The results seem exciting, mind-blowing even. But retinal neuroscientist and photographer Bryan Jones begs to differ, and he has been kind enough to let us reprint his full rebuttal below. Read more…

external Musings: Antonio Gomez Takes a Walk on Las Vegas’s Surreal Side —National Geographic

The Eiffel Tower, ancient Roman statues, an Egyptian pyramid against a background of palm trees. At first glance, you’d think that photographer Antonio Gomez traveled around the world to create this work. Yet, if you look closer it becomes clear that we’re not looking at iconic landmarks in Paris, Rome, or Cairo—strangely enough, they all exist on a single street: Las Vegas Boulevard.

 
Aug 25, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

external A Look Back At Yahoo’s Flickr Acquisition For Lessons Today —TechCrunch

Flickr decided in January 2005 to take the Yahoo offer — reportedly for $35 million. There were too many compelling reasons to take the offer during what was still an uncertain time. Because it was early in the growth of tech startups after the dot-com crash, Flickr missed some of the up-tick in the market, as others sold for more when the market took off: Myspace sold to News Corp. for $580 million in July 2005 and later YouTube, which Google acquired in October 2006 for $1.65 billion in stock. “We definitely made the wrong decision in retrospect. We would’ve made 10 times [what we did]. But it’s not like I regret it,” Butterfield says.

 
Aug 25, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Cheap Shot Challenge: Photos Taken with Expensive Gear Recreated On the Cheap

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Want to make some great photos but don’t have or don’t want to spend a lot of money? A few days ago I posted photo of a Hummingbird on my Facebook page I took with a new Nikon D810 and a 85mm 1.8. I received a comment asking me “how much money do you spend on your equipment to get a shot like this?” Others comment from time to time that they’d love to get into photography but don’t have the money.

So, I thought, how close can I come to some of the shots I get with my Nikon D600 and the D810 with a really cheap used DSLR? The personal challenge began. Read more…

external Redefining Smartphone Photography —The New Yorker

Despite Jacobson’s enthusiasm for smartphone photography, he believes that turning these images into physical prints and displaying them in a gallery context was an important step. “It not only verifies smartphone photography but also allows viewers to consider their relationship with the images,” he said.

 
Aug 23, 2014 · ↬ Via · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »