Posts Tagged ‘wwII’

These World War II Photos Were Actually Captured During a Modern Reenactment

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Conflict photography is typically a dangerous, traumatizing and, at least in part, heroic profession that puts you in the line of fire with only a camera as a weapon.

But as Penn State grad and former Onward State photographer Mitchell Wilston recently demonstrated to great effect, you don’t need to put yourself in harm’s way to capture the kinds of gritty, black-and-white conflict photography that has become iconic through the ages. Read more…

70-Year-Old WWII Foxhole Photos Turn Out to Be a Hoax

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Last week, we and many others ran the story of a rather astounding collection of photographs that were supposedly discovered in a foxhole where the infamous Battle of the Bulge took place.

Allegedly found by U.S. Navy Captain Mark Anderson and accompanying historian Jean Muller, the story goes that the duo found then scanned the images in an old camera, presenting them to the world seventy years after they were captured and left behind by a soldier who had been KIA. But that, it seems, is not the truth. Read more…

Soldier’s Camera and Photos from Battle of The Bulge Found in Foxhole 70 Years Later

Update: Turns out this story was a hoax. Head on over to our update and apology to catch up on the latest.


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The Battle of the Bulge is known as one of the most deadly and influential battles of WWII. Taking place over the course of five weeks, this surprise attack by the Germans caught allied forces off-guard, causing massive casualties, especially among U.S. Troops.

Among the 89,000 casualties was a soldier named Louis J. Archambeau, a Chicago native who left behind an interesting surprise in a foxhole he had been taking refuge in during the cold weather and rough artillery fire. Read more…

The Last of The Liberators: D-Day Veterans Photographed in the Locations where They Fought

It might be a few days after the 70th anniversary of the D-Day Invasions of Normandy, but in no way does the belated delivery of this powerful photo series diminish its impact.

Photographed by Robin Savage, The Last of The Liberators is a collection of portraits of the last British D-Day veterans. But what makes these portraits special isn’t just the people photographed, but they places they were photographed in. Read more…

Then & Now Photos Pay Tribute to The 70th Anniversary of The Liberation of Paris

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August 19th, 1944 was the beginning of The Liberation of Paris, the six-day battle between the Parisian-led French Resistance and German forces. Occupied and governed by Nazi Germany since June of 1940, it was on this day that the Parisians decided to strike back against the German garrison. Read more…

The Story Behind Robert Capa’s Pictures of the D-Day Invasion that Almost Never Were

TIME’s Behind the Picture recently dove into the fascinating story behind how some of the most iconic photographs of World War II almost never were. Narrated by John Morris, Editor of LIFE magazine during WWII, Morris tells the story behind the photographs captured by Robert Capa on Omaha Beach during the D-Day invasion. Read more…

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Minox Riga: A Subminiature Spy Camera from the 1930s

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In 1938, after many prototypes, the first 8x11mm subminiature camera was brought to market by German inventor Walter Zapp. It was called the Minox Riga, and the tiny camera actually saw espionage action in both WWII and the Cold War. Read more…

WWII Prisoners Built Improvised Cameras to Document Their Lives

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Ever since photography was invented in the 1800s, there have been people willing to risk life and limb to bring images to the public eye. Among the craziest examples are prisoners of war during World War II — people who built makeshift cameras out of smuggled parts in order to capture what life was like inside their prison camps.
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WWII Photo Reconnaissance Pilot Reacts to Footage of Himself from 1944

In honor of Memorial Day, a couple of months ago, the folks behind the Sundance Film Festival decided to dig up a short honorable mention winner from 2007 and put it up on YouTube. Called Spitfire 944, the film show WWII Photo Reconnaissance pilot Lt Col. John S. Blyth telling his story and reacting to footage of a crash landing he made all the way back in 1944 that he had never seen before. Read more…

AMMO: Cross Section Photos of Bullets

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In October of 2012, LA-based photographer Sabine Pearlman found herself ensconced in a Swiss WWII bunker photographing 900 different “specimens” of cross sectioned ammunition. Her resulting photo series, AMMO, shows the beauty and craftsmanship that went into creating these destructive little pieces of engineering.
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