Posts Tagged ‘workshop’

Aladdin’s Cave: A Look Into The Workshop of “The Camera Magician”

If you think your camera collection is impressive, you might want to check out the camera shop of Harry Mueller. Deemed “The Camera Magician,” Mueller’s shop holds over 4,000 cameras at any given time.

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Blast from the Past: Photography ‘Holiday Camp’ Video from 1961

This is pretty cool, and might just give you a good laugh at the same time. Go back in time and see what a photography ‘holiday camp’ (read: photography workshop) was like back in 1961, as what look to be a bunch of very amateur photographers try and learn to better compose and set up shots of beautiful women. Read more…

Fantastic Workshop Helps You Master the Timeless 1940s Glamour Shot

We’re not in the habit of sharing full workshop videos during the week. The way we see it, most of you are at work right now (we sure are) and don’t have time to watch a one and a half hour workshop at your desk (we sure don’t). Problem is, this 1940s Glamour Portraits workshop by Robert Harrington can’t wait. Read more…

Have Camera, Will Travel: Fifty Awesome Photo Workshops Around the World

50-workshops-world-Peta-Pixel

You could go alone to New Zealand, Mexico, Cuba, or wherever your wanderlust takes you, and bring your camera along for the trip — hope to stumble upon the ‘photographic’ spots, and take some pictures you think might be good.

Or, you could sign up for an amazing, fully immersive photography workshop in an exotic locale with a pro photographer who knows the land, guides you to all the best spots, gives you feedback during critiques, and helps you edit your new travel portfolio along the way. We prefer the latter — and after finding out about all the amazing photography courses happening all over the world this year, we had to share. Wherever and whatever your heart desires to go and photograph, there’s probably a workshop to guide you through it. Read more…

Did Wedding Videography ‘Teacher’ Rob Adams Steal His Spiel From a Peer?

(Private Video — Use password “stolen”)

Often there’s a fine line between inspiration and theft. But watching side-by-side comparisons of wedding workshops conducted by videographers Adam Forgione and Rob Adams, it’s hard not to conclude there’s wholesale plagiarism going on. Read more…

Why You Need Thick Skin When Learning Photography From Bruce Gilden

Bellamy Hunt over at Japan Camera Hunter has a fascinating account of what it’s like to attend a photography workshop taught by famed street photographer Bruce Gilden, a “famously outspoken photographer who does not mince his words”:

[Gilden] has no love for camera geeks and when he was told I am one he was not overly impressed, as he said “it is merely a tool, a box” [...] Gilden tests you, and when he asked me a question that I was unsure of the answer and tried to bluff my way through to he called me out as a bullsh*tter (true though, my fault really). Gilden likes to ask direct questions, and one of his first was “Do you want to be a photographer?” I replied in the affirmative, to which he said “why?” I was not really able to explain why in a direct manner and he pounced! “So why did you bother coming?” [...] He then told me that if I was looking for inspiration or a kick up the ass then I was in the wrong place as I would not get it from him, it must come from me (which is actually a fair point).

At this point Gilden asked to see my work [...] I had not really been able to put together a coherent selection of my work and Gilden pointed out that fact. In fact I think his words were something to the tune of “Sh*t, sh*t, sh*t. What were you thinking? This is no connection. You are lazy”. At first I was hurt and offended, but after a few minutes of thinking about this (while he tore into someone else) I realised that he was right. I have been lazy and I have not thought out my work properly in the past. I have been coasting along and not putting the effort into it that I could be [...] So after tearing myself and the other students a new one I was set a task by Gilden.

Bruce Gilden photography workshop in Tokyo [Japan Camera Hunter]

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Creating a Daguerreotype Plate Using the Becquerel Method, From Start to Finish

In daguerreotype photography, the first commercially successful photographic process, a positive image is recorded directly onto a silvered copper plate. Although mercury is traditionally used to develop the plate, there’s a way of creating daguerreotypes called the Becquerel method that eschews mercury in favor of non-lethal ingredients. According to Contemporary Daguerreotypes,

A polished silver plate is sensitized with iodine vapor. After the sensitized plate is exposed to light in a camera, the image will develop if the plate is further exposed to bright light through a red or amber filter. He called this the action of “continuation rays.” The curious aspect is you can watch the image form much like a Polaroid. Depending on how the subject of the image, how the plate was prepared and the development time, Becquerel images can be indistinguishable from mercury developed plates.

Did you catch that? The mysterious process uses sunlight to magically develop the images. In the video above, photographer Jerry Spagnoli shows how the Becquerel method is done, from start (polishing a piece of metal) to finish (a great looking photo).
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Camera Lenses with Custom Paint Jobs

A week ago we published a tongue-in-cheek post on how to improve the quality of your Canon kit lens by painting a red ring around it. While that wasn’t intended to be taken seriously, we were pointed to a Korean workshop named Park in Style that actually takes custom lens body work quite seriously. What you see above is a Canon 18-55mm kit lens that they disassembled, painted, and then reassembled to look like a Canon L lens!
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Line Up Some DSLRs for Matrix-style Bullet Time Video

Here’s an idea: find a bunch of photography-lovin’ friends, borrow their DSLR cameras, and shoot your own Matrix-style bullet time videos from home! The above video shows a workshop where they were able to bring together 24 cameras for this awesome purpose.

This reminds us of the video we shared a while back in which 52 Canon Rebel DSLRs were used to shoot bullet time videos of surfers.

(via f stoppers)

Shooting Microstock with Yuri Arcurs

This video by FotoTV features “microstock king” Yuri Arcurs leading a workshop and imparting all sorts of useful tips that you’ll find useful even if you have no interest in doing microstock — things like working with models and capturing emotion. Get out your pen and paper and start taking notes!

(via f stoppers)