Posts Tagged ‘workflow’

Speed Up Your Lightroom Editing Using a GamePad Controller

gamepad1

A little while ago, we introduced you to photographer Ed Pingol’s Cullinator, a Mac app that played nice with a PC gaming controller and helped you to significantly speed up your Lightroom workflow. As many of you pointed out, however, the Cullinator could easily be turned into a DIY project, and it looks like photographer Paul Snow of Photo Thoughts was listening.

In a step-by-step blog post, Snow details how to take a $25 Logitec F310 GamePad and customize it using the pad’s own profile tool until it works with Lightroom. Read more…

VSCO Keys Speeds Up Your Lightroom Workflow with Keyboard Shortcuts

Visual Supply Co (AKA VSCO), best known for its film emulation software, has launched a new product that’s designed to reduce the time you spend post-processing your images in Adobe Lightroom. VSCO Keys is a tool that adds powerful and customizable keyboard shortcuts to Lightroom 3 and 4. You can assign keys to the various sliders in the program, allowing you to keep your hands off your mouse during photo editing.
Read more…

Importing Multiple Memory Cards Into Lightroom At The Same Time

Here’s a great little-known tip coming at you via photographer Dan Carr that has the potential to make using Lightroom just that much easier. If you didn’t already know — and it seems most people didn’t — assuming you have enough card readers, you can actually import multiple memory cards into Lightroom all at once.

Many amateurs and most enthusiasts never shoot more than one card at a time, but professionals often fill up several over the course of a photo shoot. For them, this tip should help get the process of importing all of those cards into Lightroom closer to that ideal “set it and forget it” scenario.

(via ISO 1200)

Speed Up Your Photoshop Workflow by Colorizing and Disabling Menu Options

If you’re relatively new to Photoshop, you might not know that it’s possible to highlight and/or remove the various options in dropdown menus. All you need to do is play around with the Edit->Menus screen to make your commonly used options more visible and to reduce clutter by hiding options that you’ve never touched in your life.

(via Orms Connect)

Uncut Series of Photos Shows What it Takes to Score the Right Shot

This unique video shows an uncut series of 2,000 photographs taken by professional photographer Chase Jarvis over the course of 5 days. He estimates that only 6 to 10 of the photographs will ever be used as a commercial or fine-art photo. If you find that only a few of your shots after a long day of shooting are acceptable, don’t be discouraged — it’s like that for the pros as well!

Behind the Scenes of a “Friends in Frames” Photo Shoot

When Calle Hoglund had his buddies over one night editing a music video, he got the idea of creating a photo manipulation with his friends looking out from photo frames. The project took three hours from start to finish, and luckily for us they created a stop-motion behind-the-scenes video showing how it was done.

Workflow for the Time Lapse: Shot with my 40D every second then uploaded it to Lightroom3 where I cropped them before exporting to Quicktime Player 7 where the Timpe Laps is being made. Finally I added the two Time Lapse movies to Final Cut Pro where I added the pics and music.

It’s a fun glimpse of photographers being creative.

(via f stoppers)

Leaf Capture Remote iPad App Allows You to View Photos Wirelessly As You Shoot

Photographers can now use their iPad or iPhone to view images remotely during a photo shoot — if they’ve got a Leaf or a Mamiya digital back. Today, Mamiya and Leaf announced the release of a new App compatible with Leaf backs, as well as Mamiya’s DM-series and RZ33 digital cameras and backs. When tethered shooting on a Mac, the Leaf Capture Remote v 2.0 App allows one or more iPad or iPhone to function as a remote image viewer over Wi-Fi.

There is no live view mode, but images are available to view as they are taken. There are obvious benefits to workflow with this sort of program, since the photographer can move around while reviewing the results from shots. Also, several people can view and flip through the images on different devices, which could come in handy in large photo shoots.

The App is free from the Apple store, and works in tandem with Leaf’s Capture server, which must be installed on your computer.

Chase Jarvis Shares His Workflow and Bombproof Backup Strategies

Ever wonder how top photographers deal with their files? Chase Jarvis just put out an awesome blog post and behind-the-scenes video describing his entire workflow from capture to backup. You’ll probably be surprised at how much backing-up his studio does for all its data, and how much storage space they deal with. He points out at the end that all his strategies are scalable, so you don’t need to have infinitely deep pockets to achieve roughly the same amount of redundancy (albiet on a much smaller scale). I guarantee you’ll find this video interesting!

If you’re interested in seeing specific details, head over to the blog post for more images and text.