Posts Tagged ‘work’

Mesmerizing Cinemagraphs Capture The Monotony of ‘Routine’

routine

How do you capture ‘routine’ on camera? That was the question that talented cinemagraph creator Julien Douvier (featured before here and here) was asking himself late last year. The answer, when it struck him, was simple: nothing is perhaps more routine than our early morning walk to work.

So he set about capturing that in the only way he knew how: photography with a touch of motion — or videography with a touch of stillness — in order words, cinemagraphs. Read more…

Three Things You Ought to Know Before Deciding to Become a Nature Photographer

awild1

It’s been over two years since I cut the academic anchor and sailed away as an independent nature photographer. How am I faring? My little business is chugging along fine, thanks! I’m busy. I have an infant daughter, and I love that my new life allows the flexibility to work from home. Yet I still interact regularly with the university. I’ve just published a couple of research papers. Things are good.

I know from various conversations that some of you aspire to be photographers. This post is for those of you curious about what a transition to professional photography might hold. Read more…

Voyeuristic Portraits of New Yorkers Seen Through Apartment Windows

The photographs in photographer Gail Albert Halaban‘s series Out My Window are unsettling and beautiful at the same time. Each of them shows people framed by open apartment windows in New York City — quite creepy if the images are actually of unsuspecting strangers. At the same time, the voyeur is quite a photographer, as each shot perfectly balances the lighting of the subject inside with the cityscapes and brick walls outside.

The scenes were actually all staged, and are intended to share something that Halaban says New Yorkers can relate to: “connecting” with neighbors through apartment windows.
Read more…

Professional Photogs Find a New Niche as Vacation Photographers

It’s true that many (if not most) people these days think that a smartphone plus a decent camera app equals enough equipment to create great photography. Sure, they’ll hire a professional to do their wedding, but when it comes to less momentous occasions — like that trip to the Caribbean — they tend to take the photographic reins in their own hands. According to The Wall Street Journal, however, more and more people are deciding to hand the vacation reins over to a professional photog. Read more…

Triptych Portraits of Japanese People at Work, Home, and Play

For his project titled Peep, Japanese photographer Koji Takiguchi aimed to share glimpses into the lives of his fellow countrymen by capturing triptychs showing them at work, home, and play. He photographed people ranging from office workers to security guards, photographing them on the job, resting at home, and engaging in their favorite pastime.
Read more…

Candidtag Lets Photogs Earn Cash From Strangers Who Don’t Carry Cameras

Candidtag is a new service designed to make it easy to earn a little cash by photographing strangers you meet out in public. The idea is that there are people (e.g. tourists) out there who are too busy enjoying their lives to carry a camera around, but at the same time would like memories of their experiences. If you always carry your camera around, you can offer to take pictures for strangers and then give them a card pointing them to your Candidtag “collection”. The client can later visit the website to view the photos you took and purchase prints or digital copies. Photographers are paid by commission when sales are made.

Candidtag (Thanks Justin!)

Mailman Photographs the Dogs That Want to Kill Him

Everyone knows that mail carriers and dogs don’t mix very well. San Diego mailman Ryan Bradford decided to document his encounters with the canine adversaries along his route using a disposable ISO 400, 35mm camera purchased from Rite Aid. The delightful photo essay that resulted, titled “All the Dogs Want to Kill Me“, shows dogs glaring and barking at Bradford from the other side of fences, doors, and mail slots.
Read more…

Photojournalist is America’s Fourth Most Stressful Job

CNBC just their list of America’s 10 most stressful jobs for 2011, and “photojournalist” comes in at #4.

Much like newscasters, photojournalists are expected to be on the front lines, with a job description that requires them to enter some of the most dangerous, remote or volatile places on earth. Many are on call 24 hours a day. And when news breaks, the photojournalists may have to mobilize with extremely short notice and stay on assignment for extended periods of time.

They also report that the average salary of a photojournalist in the US is $43,270.

America’s Most Stressful Jobs 2011 (via Discarted)


Image credit: Kwon Chol by Jim O’Connell

The Windows, Doors, and Televisions of a 54-Story Apartment Building

For his project titled “Ponte City“, photographer Mikhael Subotzky photographed every door, window, and television set in a particular apartment building in Johannesburg. The photographs are then displayed on giant contact sheets, creating beautiful miniature apartment buildings out of photographs. You can view larger versions of each contact sheet on Subotzky’s website.

Ponte City DWT (via dvafoto)


Image credits: Photographs by Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, courtesy Goodman Gallery

Photos of Dogs Staring Out Car Windows

Photographer Martin Usborne shot a series of photographs of dogs patiently waiting in cars for their owners for his project “MUTE: the silence of dogs in cars“. He managed to capture their longing expressions quite well.
Read more…