Posts Tagged ‘wood’

How to Transfer a Photograph Onto a Block of Wood

Here’s a quick and easy tutorial that’ll teach you a cool method of transferring a photo print (black and white or color) onto a block of wood.
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How to Carve a Canon 1D Out of Wood

Back in 2003, Canon published a tutorial on how to carve a Canon 1D mockup out of balsa wood. The tutorial has since been taken down, but thanks to Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, much of the tutorial has been preserved. If for whatever reason you suddenly feel the urge to carve a fake camera, Canon’s step-by-step guide is a great place to start.

How to Make a Balsa Wood Canon DSLR Mockup [DO IT]

Halftone Photos Carved into Plywood

Finish modder metalfusion has a sweet DIY way of showing off photographs. After converting .jpg, .gif, or .png photographs into halftone images using a free program, they use a CNC machine to carve the image into black-painted plywood by drilling into the wood at various depths. Up close the “print” looks like a piece of wood with a bunch of holes, but step back — or squint your eyes — and the photo can be seen!

DIY CNC (via Hacked Gadgets via Engadget)

Wooden Tripod for Photographers Who Want Both Style and Stability

Most modern tripods are made of materials that are designed to be light-weight yet stable. If having the lightest of tripods isn’t a requirement for you, then check out these hand-made wooden tripods from the German company Berlebach. Though they can weigh in at 6+ pounds, the solid ash wood legs are supposedly better at dampening vibration than steel, carbon, or aluminum. Plus, they look pretty snazzy.

You can purchase them directly from Berlebach, or find one marketed as the “Expedition Wooden Tripod” over on Photojojo for $290.

(via Wired)

Homemade Wooden DSLR Shoulder Rig

Jonathan Berqvist needed a shoulder rig for stabilizing his Canon 7D when filming, and his father Erik is quite good with woodworking, so they built a do-it-yourself a wooden shoulder rig using a a single tree branch. What’s awesome about the shoulder rig is that it has follow focus built into one of the two handles used to hold it.

Berqvist also created a neat video showing the construction of the shoulder rig, starting from tree branch stage. After watching this, I found myself with a strong desire to learn woodworking:

(via Engadget)