Posts Tagged ‘windows’

Windows 7 to be the Min. Requirement for All Future Photoshop Versions

This news might not be very relevant to most of you, but Adobe has announced that future versions of Photoshop will not be compatible with Windows XP. In a post published to its blog late last week, the company writes,

The Photoshop team would like to provide advanced notice that Photoshop CS6 (13.0) will be the last major version of Photoshop to support Windows XP. (Photoshop CS6 does not support Windows Vista.) In addition, all subsequent Photoshop feature updates specifically for Creative Cloud members will no longer support Windows XP. Leveraging advances available on newer operating systems and hardware allows us to deliver significantly better performance, and focus our innovation efforts around the areas of the greatest benefit to our customers.

As the post states, CS6 already doesn’t support Vista, so you’ll need to have at least Windows 7 from here on out. It says that relying on the latest operating systems allows the software to receive better improvements in its features, since the eliminating backwards compatibility gives the developers one less thing to worry about.

(via John Nack)

Voyeuristic Portraits of New Yorkers Seen Through Apartment Windows

The photographs in photographer Gail Albert Halaban‘s series Out My Window are unsettling and beautiful at the same time. Each of them shows people framed by open apartment windows in New York City — quite creepy if the images are actually of unsuspecting strangers. At the same time, the voyeur is quite a photographer, as each shot perfectly balances the lighting of the subject inside with the cityscapes and brick walls outside.

The scenes were actually all staged, and are intended to share something that Halaban says New Yorkers can relate to: “connecting” with neighbors through apartment windows.
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Lytro Rolls Out the Windows Version of Its Software

If you’re a Windows user that preordered a Lytro light field camera, here’s some terrific news: your expensive paperweight is now a camera. Lytro announced the Windows version of its desktop application today, more than half a year after the “shoot-now-focus-later” camera was first unveiled. To free your photos from their camera prison, you’ll need to be running Windows 7 with at least 2GB of ram.

(via Lytro Blog)


Image credit: Lytro 16GB & 8GB versions by laihiu

CCFinder: A Creative Commons Photo Search Program for Windows


For Windows users who frequently need access to Creative Commons photography, Abelssoft’s free desktop app CCFinder can help streamline the hunt for a good image.

While the web-based searches of CC images through Flickr and Creative Commons’ CC Search have improved over the years, CCFinder offers a smoother user interface for searching multiple CC sources, viewing and downloading images, plus the same features with licensing explanations and options. Also, for those so inclined, CCFinder has a feature to add color filters if you upgrade to the pro version for $10.

CCFinder (via Lifehacker)

Sneak Peek at the Windows 8 Photos App

Recently, Microsoft has been showing off many of the new features we’ll be seeing in the much-anticipated official release of Windows 8, and the most recent sneak peek Microsoft gave us was of the new Photos app. The app offers a native way for Windows users to organize, view and share all of their photos regardless of what they were taken with or where they’re stored. Read more…

Microsoft Releases a Program for Making Cinemagraphs, or “Cliplets”

Cinemagraphs, or still images that have a dash of movement, have become very popular as of late. So popular, in fact, that Microsoft Research is jumping onto the bandwagon. The company has released a new tool for creating cinemagraphs, which they call “cliplets”:

A still photograph is a limited format for capturing moments that span an interval of time. Video is the traditional method for recording durations of time, but the subjective “moment” that one desires to capture is often lost in the chaos of shaky camerawork, irrelevant background clutter, and noise that dominates most casually recorded video clips. This work provides a creative lens used to focus on important aspects of a moment by performing spatiotemporal compositing and editing on video-clip input. This is an interactive app that uses semi-automated methods to give users the power to create “cliplets”—a type of imagery that sits between stills and video from handheld videos.

Their free new Cliplets app lets you easily turn a 10-second video clip into a Harry Potter-esque cinemagraph.
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Nikon Camera Control: An Open Source App for Remote DSLR Control

Nikon shooters: Nikon Camera Control is a new open source Windows application that lets you remotely control your Nikon DSLR using a PC and a USB cable. Features include tethering, remote control over camera’s basic settings, remote shutter triggering, an intervalometer for time-lapses, and fullscreen review.

Nikon Camera Control (via Nikon Rumors)

Windows 8 to Offer Improvements in Photo and File Management

The Microsoft team tasked with building Windows 8 has published a blog post with various user suggestions they’ve decided to implement in the OS. A big thing they’re focusing on is file management — something that isn’t usually touted as a “feature” but is important in day-to-day computer usage. One useful improvement is having the OS read the EXIF data in JPEG photos to automatically present the correct orientation.
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Lightscapes: Nighttime Cityscapes With the Cities Stripped Away

For his project Lightscapes by photographer James Reeve photographed cities at night, and then stripped away everything but the lights and windows. The technique turns both buildings and cityscapes into “anonymous patterns of light”.
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Living Pictures: Photo Collages of Windows Spotted Around the World

Photographer Anne-Laure House photographs illuminated windows at night in cities around the world, and arranges them into beautiful collages. She writes,

At nightfall, the windows of the flats that are lit up attract more attention than the façade of the buildings that frame them. Lit interiors become real tableaux vivants. The interior takes precedence over the exterior, and we can glimpse moments of people’s intimate lives. I am not actually interested in their intimacy as such, but rather by the space itself – the warmth of a particular light, the twinkling of a Christmas garland or the shimmering glow of a television, the corner of a painting. All these details stir my imagination and inspire my work. When I gaze at these windows, I like to tell myself a story. I capture these intimate moments and build my own structures.”

The collage above shows windows seen in New York City.
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