Posts Tagged ‘wildlifephotography’

Ethereal Elephant Photo Crowned Wildlife Photo of the Year

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Each year, London’s Natural History Museum hands out awards for the Wildlife Photographer of the Year, and the winner of this year’s competition brought home top prize with an ethereal, beautiful and accidental photo of elephants at a watering hold in the Northern Tuli Game Reserve in Botswana. Read more…

Remote Wildlife Camera Snags Amazing Shots of Eagle Taking Down Deer

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Before today, if you were to ask me who would win in a fight, an eagle or a deer, I would probably have bet on the deer given the obvious size advantage. But recently released shots from a wildlife camera set up in a remote corner of Siberia show how wrong I would be. Read more…

Using Crowdsourcing and Satellite Cams to Help Protect Endangered Animals

Remote cameras are a great way to shoot wildlife, and have captured to some pretty incredible photos and footage over the years. An example that comes readily to mind is the amazing Bear ‘dance party’ captured by one of Park Ranger Glenn Naylor’s wildlife cams back in July.

The Instant Wild project also uses remote cameras, but their purpose is a little different. Their cameras are helping to protect some of the world’s most endangered species … with a little help from you. Read more…

CEO Chooses Wildlife Photography and Philanthropy Over Retirement

Over the course of his 40+ year business career, Brian Hampton took the lead as CEO of 5 successful companies. Through it all, however, he had a passion for photography that never waned. And so, now that he’s retired from the business world and has time to spend pursuing that passion, he’s turned what was once a hobby into an incredibly successful wildlife photography career — as long as you don’t equate making money with success. Read more…

Nikon Under Fire for Making Gear for Both Hunters and Wildlife Photographers

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Animal welfare proponents and wildlife photographers alike are calling Nikon out for what they see as the height of hypocrisy. According to The Independent, the fact that a company “synonymous with wildlife photography” simultaneously manufactures and markets rifle scopes to hunters — and in particular big game hunters — has the animal welfare community up in arms. Read more…

Wildlife Photographer Luke Massey Talks About His Life’s Work and Passion

British photographer Luke Massey has been fascinated by the wildlife he has made a living photographing since he was a little boy stealing his sister’s camera when he went on walks. Back then he was limited to photographing the wildlife that made its home within walking distance of his front step. Today he travels all over the world.

The gear has improved, his techniques and expertise have improved, but his passion is still the same. And in this short video he talks about that passion, and drops a few tips along the way for those of you who also love snapping photos of wildlife. Read more…

Traveling Photographer Shoots the Great American West Using Only His iPhone

Getting noticed for quality landscape and wildlife photography is difficult enough, but try doing it on an iPhone. That’s what photographer Kevin Russ has been doing, traveling the great American West and capturing stunning photos using nothing more than an iPhone 4S and 5. Read more…

BTS: Documenting Lions in the African Bush For Over Thirty Years

Dereck and Beverly Joubert have spent the past 30 years living among lions in the African country of Botswana, capturing incredible photographs and footage of the majestic creatures that have garnered widespread praise. They are considered two of the world’s preeminent experts on the big cats, having created tens of films, books, scientific papers, and articles in National Geographic magazine (along with a list of filmmaking awards, including five Emmys).

CBS’ 60 Minutes recently paid a visit to the Joubert’s, creating the fascinating video above that shows how the duo live and work, and how they’ve dedicated their lives to documenting and protecting the cats from human threats.
Read more…

Deer Strolls by Oblivious Photographer

Being able to concentrate is a great quality to have as a photographer, but make sure it doesn’t make you tunnel vision and cause you to miss shots. Photographer Hans Kruse was photographing deer in a park outside Copenhagen, Denmark, when he spotted this wildlife photographer miss out on a close-up of a huge stag because he had his telephoto lens pointed in the wrong direction. He states,

The other photographer had been staring at the woods for a while while when this rather large deer appeared out of nowhere and tiptoed past him. I was laughing so much it was quite hard to take the picture.

This is the second story we’ve shared in the past week of a photographer not being aware of his surroundings.


Image credit: Photograph by Hans Kruse and used with permission

Use Your Car as a Photography Blind to Get Close to Wildlife

Want to get closer to animals when doing wildlife photography? If there’s access, your car can do the trick by serving as a photography blind. Scott Bourne of Photofocus writes,

For whatever reason, most wildlife (birds included) won’t spook or flush when they see a car. Open the car door, step out of the car, now that’s a totally different situation. But as long as you stay in the car, your chances of getting close enough to wildlife to get the shot are improved by 90%.

(via Photofocus)


Image credit: CAR STUCK IN SAND – BULL ISLAND by infomatique