Posts Tagged ‘wildlife’

Humor: A Curious Goat-Antelope and a Chimping Photographer

Russian wildlife photographer Igor Shpilenok captured this perfect Kodak moment of another shooter at a reserve in Kabardino-Balkaria. It humorously illustrates the dangers of chimping too much — stare too much at the back of your camera and you might miss a great photo opportunity!

In Kabardino-Balkaria Reserve [Shpilenok via Reddit]


P.S. In case you’re wondering, that photobomber is a Caucasian tur, a type of mountain-dwelling goat-antelope. Here’s an Animal Planet clip about it.

Tip: Be Careful When Mounting Cameras to the Backs of Sharks

National Geographic photographer and filmmakers do some pretty crazy stuff and use some pretty crazy gear in order to capture the perfect shot. They’re the type of people who see a large shark and, instead of fleeing the scene, think to themselves, “we should attach a camera to that thing.” And then they actually do it.

Mounting cameras on sharks is risky business, though, and the video above shows just how dangerous it can be. In it, marine biologist Greg Marshall tells of his first attempt at deploying his camera onto the back of a large shark back in 1992. It didn’t go according to plan.
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Stunning Slow-Motion Shots Created Using Only Still Photographs

It may be hard to believe, but all the amazing slow-motion clips you see in the video above were created using individual still photographs. Joe Fellows of London-based film production company Make Productions gathered photographs of wildlife and people from the WWF archives, and then Photoshopped and animated the images using parallax.
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Photographer Has His Canon 5D Mark II Kidnapped and Killed by a Lion

Atlanta-based photographer Ed Hetherington makes a living photographing weddings, but earlier this month he traveled to Zimbabwe for a wildlife photography adventure. While there, he had a unique experience he won’t soon forget: a lion stole his camera.
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Gotta Catch ‘Em All: Photog Spends Eight Years Capturing the 39 Birds of Paradise

If you’ve ever played any of the Pokémon video games, you probably know it feels like to spend hours or days trying to capture a rare monster in order to fill in another entry in your Pokédex. National Geographic photographer Tim Laman knows that feeling through his photography project titled Birds of Paradise. Laman spent a whopping eight years photographing all 39 birds-of-paradise species in the rainforests of New Guinea — the first time it has ever been done.

The behind-the-scenes video above shows how Laman spent countless hours perched atop trees, patiently waiting, hoping, and praying for the birds to land on a nearby branch.
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Winner of GDT European Wildlife Photog of the Year 2012: “The Stargazer”

Finland-based photographer Tommy Vikars won this year’s GDT European Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest with the above photograph, titled “The Stargazer.” Vikars writes,

There are two brothers in my home village who look after the game in the area and feed them regularly at several locations in winter. I was welcome to photograph white-tailed deer at one of their feeding places at night. I buried my sound isolated camera box in the snow nearby. In my warm hide about 50 meters away I was ready with the camera‘s remote release. I used my other camera and a 300mm lens to check the scene. It was extremely difficult to see what was going on at the feeding place even though I had exhausted ISO and exposure values to their absolute maximum to give me at least a slight idea when to trigger the camera. I took many photographs, but often the deer would move too fast or in the wrong direction given the long exposure time. When I finally saw this image on my computer screen, I was very pleased with the result.

The photo was shot using a Nikon D700 and 16-35mm VR lens at f/4, 30s, ISO 2000.

(via GDT via Photojojo)


Image credit: Photograph by Tommy Vikars/2012 GDT European Wildlife Photographer

Beautiful Studio Portraits of Injured Birds at a Bird Sanctuary

Grounded is a project by photographer Bob Croslin that features beautiful studio portraits of birds that are recovering from injuries at a bird sanctuary.
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Why Photographing Gorillas in the Wild Takes a Huge Amount of Guts

Want to see what it’s like to photograph wild gorillas up close and personal? Check out the clip above from the 1974 documentary Gorilla by Dieter Plage. It shows Belgian photographer and conservationist Adrien Deschryver in heart of Kahuzi-Biega National Park in Zaire, snapping pictures of gorillas from a short distance away.

In dramatic scenes the tale of an abandoned baby is shown in heart-stopping detail. Brought into the forest by Deschryver to help it adjust to its natural habitat, it begins to scream when it hears other gorillas, and is subsequently snatched from him by the dominant silverback. Stunning photography captures the sheer force of the silverback’s intimidating demonstration before he grabs the youngster.

Deschryver demonstrates one of the things you learn in Photographing Gorillas 101: don’t run when they charge.
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Tiny Cameras Mounted to Birds Capture What Life is Like With Wings

For nearly half a decade now, filmmaker John Downer has been pioneering the use of tiny cameras to capture photographs and videos from a bird’s-eye view — literally. He attaches extremely small and light HD cameras to the backs of birds in order to capture incredible point-of-view imagery of the animals going about their day-to-day lives.
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How Not to To Photograph a Wild Bison

A couple of weeks ago, we shared the sad story of how one hiker was killed after venturing within 50 yards of a grizzly bear to snap photographs. One of the biggest rules for photographing wildlife is to make sure you’re a safe distance from the wild animals. This distance varies depending on the animal you’re photographing. For grizzly bears, you’re supposed to stay at least a quarter of a mile away.

We’re not sure what the safe distance is for wild bison, but one thing we do know: it’s way farther than what we see in the video above. In it, a tourist family visiting Yellowstone National Park come across a bison standing next to the trail they’re on. Instead of finding a safe way around, the people somehow come to the conclusion that walking straight up to the horned animal with outstretched cameras is a good idea. They quickly learn what a bad idea it is. Luckily, no one gets hurt and everyone ends up having a chuckle, but it’s startling to see how much our culture of online photo sharing has eroded common sense in some people.

(via Doobybrain)


Update: Apparently the safe distance for photographing bison is 25 yards. Also, see if you can spot the guy in the background shooting away with his iPad.