Posts Tagged ‘webapp’

Flickr Photos Turned into Photomosaics

For a Yahoo HackU programming competition, a group of students at the University of Washington created FlickrMosaic, a simple app that creates photomosaics from Flickr photographs. The website randomly selects a Creative Commons-licensed photograph from Flickr, then begins transforming it into a photomosaic by adding other photos as small squares.

Sadly, the app is limited to random photos, meaning you can’t provide it one of your own to transform. Hopefully that gets added in the future though — it could be a super simple way to create a nifty image.

Find Photographs that Look Similar To Yours with BYO Image Search

Did you know that Idée Inc., the company behind reverse-image search engine TinEye, also has a web app called BYO Image Search Lab that can take any photo you provide it and find photographs that look similar to it? It’s a neat way to be inspired by how other photographers approached shooting similar scenes.

Find the Golden Hour of Your Location with the Twilight Calculator

The Twilight Calculator is a free and useful web app that takes in your location and spits out a table with when you should photograph if you want to shoot during golden hour.

Watch Your Life Flash Before Your Eyes with Pummelvision

Pummelvision is a neat little website that aims to help you see your life flash before your eyes by taking your Flickr, Facebook, and Tumblr photos, combining them into a rapid-fire slideshow set to music. Once the video is done the service uploads it to Vimeo or YouTube for you. The above is an example Pummelvision video created with the photos of Justin Ouellette of chromogenic (we interviewed him a while back).

Pummelvision (via Lifehacker)

lenshero Aims to Help You Find the Perfect Lens for Your Camera

The people behind camera comparison and recommendation website snapsort have just launched lenshero, a site designed to recommend the lens you need at the price you want. After telling the application your camera and what you’re looking for in a lens (e.g. type, focal range, price), the site will spit out some recommendations of lenses that fit your criteria, ordering them by their pros and cons. It’s a neat little app that you might want to bookmark if you’re in the market for some new gear.

DropMocks Makes Sharing Photos Quick and Stupidly Easy

DropMocks is a new photo sharing service designed to help you share photographs online as quickly and easily as possible. Created with HTML 5, the service has a minimalistic homepage that invites you to drag and drop photos into the browser. It then adds those photos into a simple gallery, and provides you with a short URL you can share. It’s a bit like file hosting service DropBox, except for photos and done through the browser.

You don’t need an account, though you can create one to keep track of the “mocks” you create. Here’s an example mock we created using some photos from PetaPixel’s Flickr account. Keep in mind that since the galleries are publicly accessible through private URLs, don’t upload anything you wouldn’t want to be made public.

DropMocks (via Lifehacker)

Webinpaint is a Poor Man’s Web-Based Content Aware Fill Tool

Photoshop CS5’s Content Aware Fill feature was quite a hit when it came out earlier this year, but what about free alternatives? Webinpaint is a web-based photo app that aims to do just that. You simply open up an image, paint over the area you’d like removed, and click the “Inpaint” button for the app to do its removal magic.

From tests I’ve done with the app, it’s pretty clear it doesn’t come close to the power of Content Aware Fill. However, for simple photographs without much texture or clutter, the app actually works quite well.
Read more…

Pixlr is a Free and Powerful Browser-Based Photoshop Clone

This has been around for a while already, so many of you have probably seen it, but I just started playing around with it today and was so impressed that I had to share it here. Pixlr is a browser-based Flash application for image editing that resembles Photoshop in both features and functionality. If you’re familiar with Photoshop, then you should have no trouble picking up Pixlr, which is great for situations where you’re on a computer that doesn’t have Photoshop installed.

Try it out and let us know what you think!

Easily Download Albums and Tagged Photos From Facebook Using Pick&Zip

Pick&Zip is a simple web application that lets you easily download Facebook photographs with a few clicks.

You can download photos tagged with your name, your own albums, photos tagged with friends’ names, or your friends’ albums. After selecting the photographs you’d like, you can download them as a ZIP or PDF file.

I just tried it out, and the service works pretty well, allowing you to pull photos at the highest resolution Facebook stores (720px) quickly to your computer without having to click and download individual photos.

Something that’s slightly annoying is that you can’t seem to download all possible photos with one click, but must “select all” on each individual page. The app is pretty useful, nonetheless.

Sylights Launches Nifty New Lighting Diagram Web App

Sylights (short for “Share Your Lights”) is a new website that makes it easy for you to create and share lighting diagrams.

Created by Paris-based photographers Pierre-Jean Quilleré and Olivier Lance, the service is quite minimalistic, with the main pages being a diagram editor and a browse section to check out other photographers’ diagrams. Here’s an example diagram created on the service:

The site is designed quite well, and the editor is actually easy and fun to use. You simply right-click to add elements to the canvas, and then drag, resize, and rotate them as needed. The editor uses HTML5 and CSS3, so it should work fine on devices made by companies run by CEOs who hate Flash.

If you want to try out the editor, we made a test account so you don’t have to create a new one. Use the email address “[email protected]” and the password “password”.

Sylights (via DIYPhotography)


Update: Turns out you actually don’t need an account to create or browse diagrams. Oops. You can use the test account we made to… see what it’s like to have an account?