Posts Tagged ‘waterdrop’

Clever Stop Motion Animation Seen Inside 2000 Photos of Water Drops

The video above is a creative stop-motion video that uses water drops as the “lens” through which the animation is seen. It was created without any computer-generated trickery: 2,000 individual photographs of different water drops were shot and combined to create the video.
Read more…

Shooting a Macro Liquid Splash Photo That Looks Computer Generated

splashcgi1

I recently captured the macro liquid splash photograph above, and found that it came out looking like it was computer generated. Here’s a brief description of how the photo was created.
Read more…

Shooting High-Speed Water Drop Photos From Start to Finish

Over the past couple of years, German photographer Markus Reugels has attracted quite a bit of attention for his high-speed photographs of water drop splashes. His project, titled “Liquid Splashes”, consists of split-second photos that make colorful splashes look like tiny glass sculptures hovering in the air above a mirror. In the video above, Reugels introduces himself and his work, and takes us on a behind-the-scenes tour showing how he goes about creating his beautiful photographs.
Read more…

Time-Lapse of a Water Drop Splash

Water drop photographer Corrie White creates pretty neat “time-lapse” videos of water drops falling and making splashes. The images aren’t from the same splash: White shoots one photo of 350-400 individual drop attempts, with each photo delayed just a fraction of a second longer than the previous one. Combining the resulting images into a time-lapse (or stop-motion) video creates the result seen here.
Read more…

A Fascinating Look at the Microscopic World Inside One Drop of Water

Photographer Clemens Wirth wanted to dive into microscopy, so he attached his Canon 5D Mark II to a monocular microscope using an adapter and pointed it at one small drop of water. He was amazed to find out how much activity goes on inside ordinary water, and how detailed that tiny world is. This short film, titled “Micro Empire”, is a beautiful combination of Wirth’s footage and audio by Radium Audio.

(via Laughing Squid)

Use a Drop of Water as a Macro Lens for Phone Photographs

Here’s a super cool trick: instead of buying a special macro lens for your smart phone, simply use a drop of water! Carefully place a drop of water over your lens, carefully invert the phone, and voila — instant macro shots with the cheapest lens you’ll ever own. Alex Wild over at Scientific American has more details on the technique and some great sample shots taken with it.

Transform Your iPhone Into a Microscope: Just Add Water (via Gizmodo)

Photo of Laser Pointer Through Rain Reveals Water Drop “Snowflakes”

On a rainy day recently, light painting photographer Jeremy Jackson was playing around with a green laser pointer when he discovered something interesting: all the out of focus raindrops in the photograph had a lined pattern in them — and each one was unique! These “water drop snowflakes” were found in all of the photos he took that day.

Anyone know what causes this phenomenon?

(via DIYPhotography)


Image credit: Photograph by Jeremy Jackson and used with permission

Worlds Captured in Drops of Water

We’ve featured photographs of paintings and candies captured in drops of water before, but photographer Markus Reugels‘ water drops double as planets. By photographing drops of water in front of images of Earth and the moon, he’s able to transform the liquid spheres into beautiful worlds.
Read more…

MC Escher Painting Photographed in a Drop of Water

It took Steven Silton two hours and 150 tries to capture this amazing photograph of a water drop showing an MC Escher painting.

The hardest part was focusing, in the set up picture I posted in the first comment you can see a piece of string above the eye dropper. I would let that hang down off the eye dropper and focus on that, then move it and squeeze the dropper and the shutter at almost the same time. [#]

He used a Canon 7D and 60mm macro lens, shooting at ISO 640, f/2.8, and 1/250.
Read more…

The Amazing High Speed Bullet Photography of Alexander Augusteijn

If you think shooting fast moving animals is difficult, try shooting bullets slicing water drops. That’s the kind of mind-boggling photography that Alexander Augusteijn does. There’s no tricks or clever Photoshop manipulations involved… just dedication and a whole lotta patience.
Read more…