Posts Tagged ‘walkthrough’

How Woot’s Product Photographs are Shot

The popular deal-a-day website Woot made this fun behind-the-scenes video showing how the site’s product photographs are made.

How to Photograph Buildings Using Two Canon 430EX Speedlites

Here’s an educational time-lapse tutorial by Los Angeles-based architectural photographer Mike Kelley in which he walks through how he goes about photographing buildings. His technique might be described “manual HDR” — after shooting the building over a longish period of time to capture different lightings, he then enters the scene and lights different areas of the building using two Canon 430EX Speedlites. Afterward, he loads the stills into Photoshop and selects different portions of the scene from different photos depending on the lighting he wants. The finished composite photo ends up looking as if it were lit by a large number of Speedlites.

(via Strobist via Fstoppers)

How to Shoot, Print, and Frame a Massive Photo on a Budget

Want to adorn a wall with a giant print using your own photography? Here’s a great video in which photographer Lee Morris shares how he shot, printed, and framed a massive 5-foot-wide panoramic print for less than $150 — super cheap compared to the $1,000+ you might pay to have it professionally done. After shooting multiple photos on a bridge in Rome, he merged the images using Photoshop, had a metallic print made by Bay Photo Labs, and then framed it using a large mirror he found at Bed Bath and Beyond. The final result is quite impressive!


Disclosure: Bay Photo Labs is a sponsor of PetaPixel

Street Photographer Joel Meyerowitz Shares His Thoughts and Techniques

Here’s a video in which renowned street photographer Joel Meyerowitz shows us his method of doing street photography. His quiet, friendly, and “invisible” style is quite different from Bruce Gilden’s in-your-face technique. The New Yorker also has a great video on Meyerowitz’s photography.


Thanks for the tip, Graysmith!

Photographer Richard Misrach and His Hurricane Katrina Graffiti Photos

After Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, photographer Richard Misrach visited the empty city and documented the destruction. Although he shot roughly 1,000 photos using an 8×10 large format camera, he noticed that many of the snapshots he captured using a point-and-shoot camera told an interesting story of what had occurred. These photos, which showed the graffiti messages left by residents fleeing their homes, were subsequently published in a book titled “Destroy this Memory“. In the video above, Misrach tells the story of how the project came to be.

Destroy This Memory (via dvafoto)

How Not to Do Street Photography

If you want to do street photography, attacking people with cameras like Fabio Pires does in London probably isn’t the way you should go about doing it — unless you’re trying to give photography a bad name. Does anyone know of any good behind-the-scenes videos of good (and candid) street photography being done in a respectable way?

(via Reddit)

Street Photography as Seen through the Viewfinder of a Leica M9

Street photographer Eric Kim generated some buzz last month by recording himself shooting on the street with a GoPro mounted to his Leica M9. Now, he’s back again with an even cooler point of view: through the Leica M9′s viewfinder itself. This 10 minute video of Kim doing street photography in Santa Monica was recorded using a HTC EVO 4G smartphone stuck to the back of his camera.

Wouldn’t it be awesome if this kind of footage existed for all the iconic photographs taken throughout history?

Restoring a Tintype Photo from the 1870s

Photo restorer Bob Rosinsky of Top Dog Imaging wrote an interesting article describing how he restored a tintype photograph from the 1870s brought to him by a client.

My standard operating procedure is to use an ultra-high resolution camera combined with a top-of-the-line macro lens to photograph tintypes. I use strobe lights to illuminate the artwork. Strobes produce “hard” light, much like the sun on a clear day. In addition to the strobes, I place a polarizer over the camera lens and polarizer gels over the strobe lights. This eliminates all reflections and enables the camera to pick up a greater tonal range along with more detail.

[...] I began the laborious process of restoration, which involved a prodigious amount of retouching.

Reminds us a bit of this 76-year-old Chinese Photoshop master’s work.

Restoring a Photograph from the 1870s (via kottke.org)


P.S. Earlier this week another tintype photo from the same decade sold for $2.3 million.

Post-Processing a Band Photograph

Some friends of mine asked me to shoot a quick band photograph of them recently without any preparation or planning. Luckily, the location was pretty nice (we were at a hostel) and the weather was a bit cloudy so there wasn’t harsh sunlight.
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Shooting Creative Long Exposure Photos with Light Stencils

I imagine, almost everyone interested in photography has seen the stunning pictures created with a technique called light painting. You set your camera to long exposure, 20 to 30 seconds or even longer, and use a light source, a flashlight or LED light, to “paint” with it. Most pictures have some kind of magic touch to it because you see only the track of light afterwards and not the actual light source. Light stencils are somewhat related to light painting. It uses the long exposure as well but uses a flash to illuminate a stencil to stamp the motive into the picture.
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