Posts Tagged ‘walkthrough’

How to Create Fake X-Ray Photos of Deconstructed Gadgets

Back in November of last year, we featured a project by photographer Max de Esteban titled Proposition One that consisted of pseudo-X-Ray photos of deconstructed gadgets. Max carefully deconstructs old gadgets, coats them with white spray paint, and puts them back together while photographing each step. He then spends 2-3 weeks combining all the different layers together to create a see-through view of each gizmo. The behind-the-scenes video above shows one of his images being made.

(via ISO 1200)

Time-Lapse of a Plane Crash Composite Photo Being Created in Photoshop

Think you’re good with Photoshop? Graphic designer Alexander Koshelkov created this amazing time-lapse video showing how he created an epic plane crash image in Photoshop using elements found in other photographs (e.g. freeways, an airplane, destroyed engines and cars). The project took Koshelkov nearly 4.5 hours and required 244 separate layers.
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The Science Behind Tintype Photography

Here’s another video featuring SF photo shop Photobooth and its tintype portraits. Will and Norm of Tested talk to shop owner Michael Shindler, who goes in depth into how tintype photographs are created and the science behind the process.

Lunacycle: Photographing and Animating a Lunar Cycle

Since November 2011 I’d been thinking about an astrophotography project: take a photo of the moon each day from full moon to full moon, then combine it into a seamless movie that looks as if someone had moved the sun around the moon for one minute. I found similar videos, but most were simulations done in software, or photographic ones that weren’t very smooth. Seemed simple enough, mostly because I didn’t see the complications that would come along with this project caused by… physics.

My plan involved setting the same exposure each night starting with the full moon, and let the moon’s dark side gradually move across its face while the lit side stayed about the same brightness. Adjust the photos’ angles to match each other, throw all of them into Final Cut Pro X and add cross dissolve transitions between them, and I’d get a smooth movie showing every phase of the moon.
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GigaPain: The World’s Largest Photo of Shelves

By and large, as a professional of whatever description, clients hire you based on experience and expertise, grace under pressure, problem-solving skills, and your finely-tuned ability to transcend the limitations of the assignment and distill the essence of an idea into its most purely realized form.

Okay so that’s what they tell you in college, but honestly it’s mostly just blather. Assignment photography is a hot-dog factory where the end results are images rather than sausages. If people saw what went into some of this stuff there’s no way they’d want anything to do with it. The sad reality is that there are all kinds of reasons you’re brought in on projects, some of them more edifying than others. Sometimes you’re exactly the right person for the job, other times you’re just a camera monkey. My favourite is the “wouldn’t-it-be-cool-if” call, where everyone gets all excited about an idea that turns out to be completely impractical. Well, this is the story of one of those ideas that actually managed to see the light of day.
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A Typical Workday for Street Fashion Photographer Nick Fancher

Columbus, Ohio-based photographer Nick Fancher works as the lifestyle photographer of Men’s online shopping club JackThreads, a job that has him shooting lifestyle photos for 8-12 brands every single day. The behind-the-scenes video above shows what a typical day for Fancher looks like as he hurries around to different locations in the city to photograph his models wearing different clothing items from different brands. It not only shows the process of shooting the images, but also lighting diagrams and final results as well.

(via Doobybrain)

Composite Diner Photograph Shot with 24 Lights and 20 Subjects over 12 Hours

Here’s a video in which photographer Ryan Schude walks through how he went about shooting a photograph titled “The Diner”. The image involved 24 lights, 20 subjects, and 12 hours of shooting. Check out his crazy lighting diagram and the finished photo.

(via Scott Kelby via Fstoppers)

Free iPad App with Lighting Recipes by Scott Kelby

Photoshop guru Scott Kelby has released a free iPad app that teaches the lighting techniques he used for various photographs in his portfolio.

The newly released Scott Kelby’s Lighting Recipes is a free iPad app that walks you through twenty shots in thirteen different lessons. With an approximately 45 minute runtime, each lesson has a gear guide, and lighting diagrams, as well as production shots, and the final image. And yes, there is Kelby’s commentary as well.

Scott Kelby’s Lighting Recipes (via PopPhoto)

How Civil War-Era Tintype Photographs Were Made

Ever wonder how photographs were made back in the days of the Civil War? This video by the George Eastman House provides an interesting step-by-step look at how tintype photographs are created. It’ll make you feel spoiled as a modern day photographer.

(via Photographs on the Brain)

How to Visualize Photography Lighting Setups in Blender

Not too long ago I finally got around to picking up a decent manual flash for exploring lighting and speedlight techniques. I picked up a Yongnuo YN-560 Speedlight Flash for Canon and Nikon, and my friend Sean was kind enough to send me his old radio triggers to play with. I was mostly all set to start exploring the world of off-camera lighting…
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