Posts Tagged ‘visionresearch’

SigZilla to be Used at the World Series on a Specially Modified Phantom Camera

You know that beastly Sigma 200-500mm that we’ve featured twice in the past two days? Turns out it’s headed to the World Series to be used for some pretty ground-breaking imagery. A post today by Jakob Schiller over at Wired fills in some interesting details on what the lens will be used for.
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Male and Female Photographers See the World Differently

If you think male and female photographers sometimes have very different styles, the reason might go beyond their tastes and approaches to shooting. Men and women see the world differently — literally. A new study by vision researchers have found that the two genders have different ways of collecting visual information.

According to the findings, men are more sensitive to moving objects and seeing small details, while women tend to be sharper in seeing color changes.
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First Slow-Motion Phantom Miro M120 Video Doesn’t Disappoint

Cinematographer Jim Geduldick was lucky enough to be the first to test out Vision Research’s new Phantom Miro M120 high-speed camera in the real world, and — luckily for the rest of us — is kind enough to share the results. Falling on the smaller, more rugged side of the Phantom line, the M120 is made to take, well, exactly the kind of footage Geduldick captured. The camera can shoot a whopping 1540 at full 1080p HD, and is estimated to cost anywhere from $25,000 to $60,000 — a bargain compared to the price tags on its more expensive siblings.

(via Gizmodo)

New Phantom v1610 Camera Can Shoot a Staggering 1,000,000fps

Shooting 4.5 million frames per second of molecules using an x-ray flash is impressive, but can non-scientific cameras come anywhere close? The answer is yes: Vision Research has a new Phantom high speed camera called the v1610 that can capture footage at a whopping 1,000,000fps. Granted, the resolution needs to be a paltry 128×16 for that fps, but at a full 1280×800 it still shoots at 16,000fps. To give you an idea of what 1 million fps is like, consider this: 1 second of the footage will provide you with 9.25 hours of uber-slow motion 30fps video.

Phantom v1610 (via PopSci)