Posts Tagged ‘view’

Exercise with a View: Check Out What ISS Astronauts See When They Bench Press

exercisecupola

NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio just arrived on the ISS last week (with the Olympic torch in tow, no less), and even though he wasn’t one of the astronauts who got to take the Olympic torch for a spacewalk/photo shoot, he wasted no time starting to upload photos from orbit.

All of the photos he’s uploaded (gallery below) are awesome for one reason or another, but one in particular has gotten a bunch of attention. Uploaded yesterday, the photo above shows the view Mastracchio and his fellow astronauts have while exercising on the ISS. Read more…

Browse Fine Art Photos with Personalized Recommendations Using Art.sy

If you’re a photo enthusiast who uses Pandora for personalized music listening, you’ll feel right at home using Art.sy. Just as Pandora uses the Music Genome Project to offer automated music recommendations, Art.sy has an Art Genome Project through which 20,000 images of art from 275 galleries and 50 museums have already been digitized, analyzed, and stored.
Read more…

Facebook Takes a Page From Google+’s Book, Unveils Mosaic View for Photos

Ever since Google+ was launched in June 2011, users have gushed over the beautiful mosaic view for photos uploaded to the service. Earlier this year Flickr redesigned its photo pages with a similar design, and today Facebook has followed suit. Photo pages on Facebook are being upgraded with larger photos and the same mosaic view that’s becoming so popular around the web. Users can also click specific photos to “highlight” them, or give them a larger piece of real estate on the page. The redesign is just starting to roll out, so you should see it live on your page soon.

(via Facebook via The Verge)

GoPro and Flip Cameras Film Rocket’s 84-Second Flight to an Altitude of 23 Miles

Forget sending cameras up to the edges of space on a weather balloon: rockets are much, much cooler (and faster). A man named Derek Deville created a homemade rocket in an effort to win The Carmack Prize, which offers $10K to anyone who can launch a rocket to above 100K feet, take a GPS reading, and then recover the vehicle. Although he failed to take a GPS reading, Deville’s rocket managed to reach 121,000ft (~23 miles) in 84 seconds.

What’s awesome is that he also attached two HD cameras to the rocket to document what the journey looks like. The side view captured by a FlipHD starts at 2:49, while footage from a GoPro pointed straight down starts at 5:15.

(via PopSci via Photojojo)