Posts Tagged ‘videos’

Beautiful Tilt-Shift Video of Coachella

Sam O’Hare is developing quite a reputation for his tilt-shift, miniature faking videos. O’Hare is the same guy that created The Sandpit, a beautiful tilt-shift video of New York City that has been watched nearly 2 million times. He was recently commissioned by the Coachella Music Festival to create a similar video for Coachella 2010, and the resulting video (shown above) is just as stunning.

It was created using the Nikon D3s, with 4 frames captured every second for the day shots and exposure times of up to 2 seconds per shot for night shots. Roughly 50,000 still images were captured, and the tilt-shift effect was added in post. There’s a pretty informative interview with O’Hare that discusses this new video here.

(via Laughing Squid)

Creative Pixilation Student Project Shot with Old 16mm Film Camera

Pixilation is the stop motion technique in which humans are used as the subject, moving through slight changes in pose and position in each successive frame. Eric Hanus, a recent graduate from Indiana University, created the above video (titled “Day Drunk”) using the technique, and doing it with a old, hacked film camera to boot. Hanus tells us,

The project was shot on a Bolex NonRelfex 16mm film camera. It was done this spring along with Jeremy and Russell (in the credits) for an Advanced Experimental Film Production class. Instead of going for an abstract, art-house type project, our goal was to create a narrative using a rarely seen experimental technique; pixilation. Since the camera is designed for 16mm motion pictures, we had to disengage the motor and manually trigger the camera to advance one frame at a time.

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Beautiful Collection of Time Lapse Clips Captured in San Francisco

A couple days ago we featured a compilation of stunning time lapse clips shot in the desert by Mike Flores. The video above is a change in scenery, but epic nonetheless. Photographer Simon Christen shot the various clips using a Canon 40D (10-22mm, 24-70mm, and 70-200mm) around the San Francisco Bay Area over the course of a year. His camera was always in manual mode, and he adjusted the settings as the light changed due to things like fog and clouds.

Here’s another video we posted a while ago that gives you a beautiful glimpse at what San Francisco is like.

Seamless One World Portrait by Jock McDonald

Jock McDonald is a San Francisco-based photographer that has travelled the world, photographing people of different ages and cultures. He recently teamed up with animator Paul Blain to transform his black-and-white portraits spanning decades into a single 17-minute long video. The twist is that the transitions between faces are seamless using morphing, resulting in what feels like a single, dynamic portrait of the world.

If you’d like to try and create a similar video with portraits you’ve taken, there are free programs that can help you do so.

(via Lens Culture)

BBC Series from 1983 Featuring Masters of Photography

In 1983 the BBC aired a series called “Master Photographers” in which they interviewed some of the biggest names in photography at the time, including Ansel Adams, Diane Arbus, and Henri Cartier-Bresson. The series can’t be found anywhere on DVD, but luckily many of the episodes have been uploaded to YouTube. If you’re at all interested in learning how historical greats worked and thought, this is a video series you have to bookmark and chew through.
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Unbelievably Realistic Camera Tour of a Computer Generated Classroom

If you were reading PetaPixel earlier this year, you probably remember the jaw-dropping CGI animation titled “The Third & The Seventh“. Here’s another extremely realistic and detailed computer-generated animation that simulates a camera traveling through a classroom (with lens flares and all). It was created by Israel-based Studio Aiko.

The scene was modeled using 3D Max and rendered with V-Ray, and was created over a period of 6 months.
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Sara Bareilles Music Video Features Polaroids and Contact Sheets

The music video for Sara Bareilles’ song “King of Anything” has everything contained in Polaroids and contact sheets. The concept is pretty neat. Can you imagine how mind-boggling this video would have been if they had done it in stop-motion with individual Polaroid photos and carefully exposed film strips? That’d be epic.

P.S. Here’s an example of epic contact sheet art from last month.

Canon Versus Nikon Destruction Tests

This is a 17 minute video showing Kai over at DigitalRev (the same guy that painted a Nikon D90 pink) putting a Canon 400D and Nikon D70 through various torture tests. The tests include stabbing them with knives, dropping them down escalators, smashing them with elevator doors, using them as stilts, and more.

It’s painful to watch, and not just because beautiful cameras are being abused — the video is much too long. However, it’s interesting to see how much damage entry-level DSLR cameras can take and still remain functional.

The Cliche of Enhancing Images in Movies

Here’s a fun video that compiles quite a few clips from movies where “experts” look for clues to mysteries in videos and photographs, often “enhancing” them in ridiculous ways before suddenly discovering something earth-shattering.

As you know, scriptwriters often try to make their characters sound like experts by having them drop random technical terms, whether or not the things they say actually make sense. This is usually seen in science fiction movies where the scientists are forced to somehow explain how non-existant technology works in layman’s terms, but here’s a funny example for all you photogs to enjoy.

Enhance it!

Polaroid Promotional Film from the 1970s

If you’re a fan of the Polaroid SX-70, this promotional video from the 1970s should stir up warm fuzzy feelings. If you’ve never used one, watching this might give you a better idea of why so many are obsessed with it.

Even if you’re already a SX-70 fanatic, you might learn a thing or two from certain parts of this video that shed light on exactly how the system works.