Posts Tagged ‘videogames’

Nostalgic Photo Series Shows the Evolution of Video Game Controllers

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Photographer Javier Laspiur has long been a fan of video games and their respective consoles. And so, to pay tribute to the consoles of his past and the memories he made with them, he created a series that takes us on a journey through the consoles of Laspiur’s past and gives us a fascinating ‘time-lapse’ look at how much consoles have changed over the decades. Read more…

Virtual Photojournalists Document Mayhem In ‘Grand Theft Auto’ World

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Photojournalism jobs may be disappearing in real life, but they’re thriving in at least one corner of the Interwebs. A handful of participants in the online version of “Grand Theft Auto” have decided it’s more fun to document virtual felonies than commit them and have formed a team of street photographers. Read more…

New ‘Nano-Camera’ from MIT Sees Things at the Speed of Light, Costs Only $500

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A super-fast, affordable new camera currently under development at MIT could improve everything from video game experiences to driving safety, researchers reported at a recent tech convention. Read more…

Video Game Uses 18-DSLR Rig to Create Head Scans of Athletes

Over the past week, we’ve had the opportunity to share stories that showed both the intersection of camera technology and sports, as well as camera technology and 3D modeling for video games. The video above has a little bit of both. Read more…

The Art of Video Game Photography

Video Game Tourism has an interesting article about the growing art of video game photography, or artistic snapshots captured in the virtual worlds of games:

Games are spaces of experience as much as entertainment. It shouldn’t surprise us that the photographic gaze, that eye for composition and purely visual aesthetic, finds ample opportunity for snapshots in these virtual spaces. In fact, it’s surprising that in-game-photography – for purely aesthetical reasons as opposed to documenting victories or snapping a pic of an impressive vista for use as a desktop wallpaper – is still as unexplored a country as it still seems to be.

[…] The art of in-game-photography is still in its infancy, but it seems obvious that, with constantly increasing photorealism and the popularity of open-world-games, more and more photographers will also look for inspiration and picture opportunities in virtual worlds. Games are places as well as entertainment; and after all, as Elliott Erwitt’s quote at the beginning reminded us: Photography has little to do with the things we see -, and everything to do with the way we see them.

The piece features five leading video game photographers: Duncan Harris, Iain Andrews, James Pollock, Josh Taylor, and Leo Sang. Some of their work is so eye-catching that game companies have asked to use the photos in their promotions.

The Art of in-game Photography [Video Game Tourism]


Image credits: Photographs by James Pollock and Iain Andrews

The Camera Logic of Super Mario World

In both still photography and video, camera work should generally be invisible to viewers, allowing them to focus on the subject being captured. The same is true for video games. Here’s a nerdy yet fascinating analysis of the camera in the legendary SNES game, Super Mario World. It’s so simple, yet so well designed that it’s not something you’ve probably ever thought about.

(via Coudal)

What Classic Video Games Would Look Like in the Real World

Prior to the fancy graphics video game players enjoy today, classic games were based on simple geometric forms. German photographer Patrick Runte decided to do a quirky photo project exploring what these games might look like if translated to the real world. His series, titled Jump ‘N’ Run, shows people dressed in simple costumes of “characters” from games like Pac-Man, Pong, and Tetris.
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What if Learning to Use Photoshop Was More Like Learning to Play Portal?

Learning to play a game and learning to use Photoshop follow two, very different patterns. In the first you “discover” how the game is played, you fiddle with the buttons, try combinations, have eureka moments and eventually become proficient at it. Learning Photoshop, on the other hand, requires extensive tutorials and help; books are available from thin “easy-to-use” instruction books to heavy tomes many hundreds of pages long.
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How Playing Video Games Can Help You Become a Better Street Photographer

People ask me, “Jun Shen, how do you shoot so fast on the streets?!?” I’m like a ninja, whipping out my camera, shooting it, and putting it away so quickly that my subjects don’t know what hit them. They walk away whispering to themselves, “What was that? Did he take our photo?

It’s thanks to video games, folks. Read on to find out why.
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Portraits of Online Gamers Next to Their Alter Egos

For his project Alter Ego, photographer Robbie Cooper traveled around the world to shoot portraits of online gamers. He then combined his portraits with screenshots of the gamers’ avatars in the various games they play, showing an interesting side-by-side comparison of what the people look like in the real world compared to what they choose to look like in their fantasy worlds. The project got its start back in 2003 after Cooper did a shoot with a CEO who used the game Everquest to communicate with his children after getting divorced.
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