Posts Tagged ‘videogame’

Magic Lantern Brings Brick Breaker-Style Video Game to the Canon 7D

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Lest you think that smartphones have the mobile gaming market all but wrapped up, the folks at Magic Lantern have decided to shake things up a little bit. In the spirit of the old Kodak DSLR that came equipped with Pong, ML’s pravdomil has added the ability to play a stripped down version of the old 1980s brick breaker-style game “Arkanoid” on the Canon 7D. Read more…

Upcoming PS4 Game ‘Outlast’ Pits Digital Camera Against Zombies

ScreenHunter_05 Jun. 14 11.52

Here’s yet another reason why it’s a bad idea to think reporters outfitted with cameras can replace actual photojournalists — the reporters apparently are dumb enough to wander into an abandoned insane asylum full of zombies.

(The first thing a real photojournalist would do, of course is ask “Do I get paid mileage?” before refusing to take the gig.)
Read more…

The Art of Video Game Photography

Video Game Tourism has an interesting article about the growing art of video game photography, or artistic snapshots captured in the virtual worlds of games:

Games are spaces of experience as much as entertainment. It shouldn’t surprise us that the photographic gaze, that eye for composition and purely visual aesthetic, finds ample opportunity for snapshots in these virtual spaces. In fact, it’s surprising that in-game-photography – for purely aesthetical reasons as opposed to documenting victories or snapping a pic of an impressive vista for use as a desktop wallpaper – is still as unexplored a country as it still seems to be.

[…] The art of in-game-photography is still in its infancy, but it seems obvious that, with constantly increasing photorealism and the popularity of open-world-games, more and more photographers will also look for inspiration and picture opportunities in virtual worlds. Games are places as well as entertainment; and after all, as Elliott Erwitt’s quote at the beginning reminded us: Photography has little to do with the things we see -, and everything to do with the way we see them.

The piece features five leading video game photographers: Duncan Harris, Iain Andrews, James Pollock, Josh Taylor, and Leo Sang. Some of their work is so eye-catching that game companies have asked to use the photos in their promotions.

The Art of in-game Photography [Video Game Tourism]


Image credits: Photographs by James Pollock and Iain Andrews

The Camera Logic of Super Mario World

In both still photography and video, camera work should generally be invisible to viewers, allowing them to focus on the subject being captured. The same is true for video games. Here’s a nerdy yet fascinating analysis of the camera in the legendary SNES game, Super Mario World. It’s so simple, yet so well designed that it’s not something you’ve probably ever thought about.

(via Coudal)

Rock Photographer: Guitar Hero Meets Pokemon Snap

Rock Photographer is a new iPhone game that can be described as a mix between “Guitar Hero for photography” and “Pokemon Snap for adults”. Each level in the game presents real footage of “bands” in action, and the player’s job is to use their iPhone as a camera:

Just like a real camera, tilt your phone to look around inside level as the band plays. You can shoot from different positions to get the best angle. When you see something interesting happen, tap the screen to take a photo.



If your timing & frame is right, you’ll get big points! If not, you’re going to waste up all your film before the level is over. Special objectives are hidden throughout the levels waiting to be found. They just have to be taken at the perfect moment. 

Save up the points you earn to unlock hidden features, and become the World’s Greatest Rock Photographer!



The app was created as a collaboration between photographer Joey L and development duo the All Nighters.
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Photographs Recreated Inside a Computer Game

New media artist Kent Sheely took some of his old photographs and recreated them inside the sandbox physics game Garry’s Mod. Each “virtual photo” took about 2-3 hours to recreate: Sheely had to pick out models, set up objects, tweak details, and position everything while looking through the stationary camera view in the game.
Read more…

Warco: An FPS in Which You’re Armed with a Camera Instead of a Gun

Warco — short for War Correspondent — is an upcoming video game in which the player takes on the role of a journalist named Jesse DeMarco. Despite being classified as a first person shooter, the objective is to shoot people with a camera rather than a gun. After venturing into dangerous conflicts and risking your life to snag some footage, you’re given the task of editing the video into a compelling news story. It almost seems like a Pokemon Snap game for adults. If they went a step further and made an online multiplayer mode, that’d certainly be… interesting.

Warco (via Ars Technica)

Upcoming Horror Video Game to Make Use of Real Camera

Back in 2009 we published a post highlighting 8 video games that feature photography. One of them was Fatal Frame, and an upcoming spin-off of the game will involve using an actual camera during gameplay. Shinrei Shashin, which translates to “Spirit Photo”, is being developed for the Nintendo 3DS, and makes heavy use of the portable game system’s 3D-capable cameras. Imagine playing the game in a dimly-lit room, and seeing a ghost in your room through the camera — horror games may soon become a whole lot more creepy thanks to built-in cameras and augmented reality. No word on release date, or whether the game will be available outside Japan.

(via andriasang via Joystiq)

Third Person Point of View Camera Rig Turns Your Life into a Video Game

The Third Person Point of View Camera Rig is a unique project by UTSI PhD student Jason King that aims to create a wearable camera that allows users to view life through a third-person, video-game style point of view. A camera is mounted to a backpack, which then feeds the video into the goggles of the wearer. There’s even an Instructables tutorial that teaches you how to make your own, if you’re so inclined.

Regardless of whether or not this has practical applications for life, if it’s commercialized in the future a lot of video-game addicts will finally have a way to feel more comfortable in the real world.

(via PhotoWeeklyOnline)

Pac-Man Performed in Stop-Motion with Humans as Pixels

French-Swiss artist Guillaume Reymond created this fun little stop-motion video showing Pac-Man being played at a movie theater in Switzerland last month. The project had 111 patient volunteers sit, shift, and change shirts over the course of more than four hours. This is the fifth video in Reymond’s GAME OVER project, in which he recreates classic arcade games with humans as pixels.

(via Laughing Squid)