Posts Tagged ‘uvfilter’

Breakthrough Photography’s X-Series Filters are Ultra-Thin, Easy to Remove, and Affordable

Breakthrough

Breakthrough Photography today announced a new lineup of X-Series Traction UV and ND filters that are drawing a lot more attention than your standard lens filter typically gets.

The series consists of three separate models, each of which measures in at between 3.2 and 3.5mm in depth, comes in filter sizes between 49mm and 82mm, and includes a clever ring setup that makes placing and removing the filters less of a hassle. Read more…

Hoya’s New HD2 Lens Filters Can Survive Being Whacked by a Pipe

filterpipe

At CES 2013 earlier this year, Hoya showed off a new series of lens filters called the HD2. The main feature of the filter set is its strength: each filter uses hardened glass that can take a serious beating without getting damaged or shattering.
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Cokin Unveils Pure Harmonie, the World’s Skinniest Lens Filters

cokinpureharmonie

French optical filter company Cokin has launched a new line of lens filters under the brand name Pure Harmonie. The new filters are unique in that they’re the thinnest and lightest in the world — the UV filter in the set measures only 3.3mm (~0.13in) thick!
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This Is Why You Shouldn’t Buy a Cheap UV Filter for Your Lens

UV lens filters are a popular way to protect the front element of lenses from damage, but you should make sure you invest in a high-quality one unless you want to make a huge sacrifice in image quality. Reddit user EvilDoesIt shot the photos above comparing a cheap filter with a pricier one:

The top one is a $20 Quantaray UV filter. Bottom is a ~$70 B+W MRC UV filter. This is a more extreme example, but it shows the difference between a nice filter and a crappy cheap one. Both these shots are unedited JPEGs from my Nikon D7k with a Nikkor 17-55 ƒ/2.8 @ 1.3s ISO100.

I do realize that the top pic can be easily fixed by adjusting levels, but in my opinion, it’s always better to get the best picture you can get out of your camera before editing. [#]

His last sentence is a gem: to achieve the best images, you want to make sure you’re squeezing out the best image quality you can from each step along the way.


Image credit: Photographs by EvilDoesIt and used with permission

Use a Shoe to Remove Stuck Lens Filters

Here’s a quick tip for if you ever have a hard time removing a lens filter from a lens (e.g. when it’s damaged): use a shoe. Simply take any shoe with a grippy flat bottom, press it firmly against the filter, and then turn it. It’s a super simple technique that should work every time unless the threads on the lens itself are badly damaged.


Thanks for the tip, Luke!

How to Remove a Smashed Filter That’s Stuck on a Lens

Using a filter is a great way to protect your lens from damage, but if you accidentally drop your camera and smash the filter, there’s a good chance you won’t be able to remove the filter from your lens’ threads. Here’s a quick video that shows how you can remove a stuck filter — all you need is a strong pair of pliers.

(via ISO 1200)