Posts Tagged ‘useful’

Cute Camera Pillow Boxes Made from an Old Photo Book

Flickr user Betty Ann recycled a photography book by transforming pages into these nifty pillow boxes, with each one showing a different camera. Stick a gift certificate to your favorite local camera shop into one and it’ll make the perfect gift for a photography-lovin’ friend! You can find a step-by-step tutorial on how to make your own pillow box over on eHow.

(via Craft)


Image credit: Camera Pillow Boxes by b-a-boop and used with permission

Add-on Grips for Compact Cameras Designed for Little Hands

Compact cameras are portable and convenient, but often they trade ergonomics for their small size. If your camera is a bit too small to hold comfortably in your large hand, Flipbac Camera Grips are designed to help you get a grip. Their shapes are inspired by actual grips found on larger compact cameras, and each one sticks to your camera securely and non-messily using 3M adhesive.
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Adobe Nav Lets You Control Photoshop from Your iPad

Adobe announced new tools today that lets developers create tablet apps — called Photoshop Touch Apps — that interact directly with Photoshop CS5. They also created a few apps to showcase some of the possibilities of using a tablet while working in Photoshop, including one called Adobe Nav. Basically it turns your iPad into a separate interface for controlling Photoshop, allowing you to select tools, customize the toolbar, or manage your open files by conveniently showing them as thumbnails. It’ll be available for $2 starting in early May, but we can’t wait to see what other apps developers will unveil before then!

Adobe Nav (via Photojojo)

Simple Guide for Getting Started in Digital Photography

Reddit user geft created a useful primer to get newbies started in digital photography. It’s a single image measuring 1045×5480 pixels that covers sensors, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and camera controls. This would be a great thing to print out, laminate, and give as a gift to someone who’s looking to learn.

Simple Guide to Photography (via Reddit)


Image credit: Graphic created by geft and used with permission

Preserve Your Privacy by Pixelating Photographs with PhotoHide

Hiding or censoring part of an image through obfuscation is as easy as selecting the area in Photoshop and applying the Pixelate->Mosaic filter, but what if you don’t have an image editing program at your disposal? If you’re seriously paranoid about your privacy on the Internet, there’s a new service called PhotoHide that helps you quickly add these pixelated areas to any photo. Everything is done through the web browser, and you can download the final image once you’re done.

Doing this to every single photo of you on the Internet would be ridiculous, but you might find it useful for more reasonable applications (e.g. hiding your house or license plate number in a photo).

PhotoHide (via PhotographyBLOG)

Use a Field Notebook to Jot Down “EXIF Data” for Your Film Photos

One of the big advantages of digital photography is that EXIF data is embedded into your images, allowing you to easily learn when and how (and more recently where) a particular photograph was captured. If you still enjoy shooting film, then a solution is to jot down notes about your photography while you’re shooting. The “Field Notebook” is a nifty little notebook published by Etsy user fabriKateShop you can use to record “EXIF data” by hand — especially useful for when you’re taking a film photography course. You can find them for about $12 each over on Etsy.

fabriKate Shop (via Photojojo)

Cardboard USB Sticks Perfect for Sharing Photos with Friends

The Flashkus by Art Lebedev is a cheap, disposable, and environmentally friendly cardboard USB stick that might one day make sharing event photos with friends much easier and cheaper. While many websites are geared towards photo sharing, transferring gigabytes of data to friends is still difficult to do via the Interwebs, so people often choose to burn DVDs or use pricey USB drives. The Flashkus would make the process easier by allowing people to simply tear off a USB drive, dump photos onto it, scribble a note onto the front, and hand it off to their friends. Once the photos are downloaded, the drive can be reused or thrown away.

It’ll be available in 4GB, 8GB, and 16GB but currently seems to be in the concept/design stage. Hopefully Art Lebedev adds it to their online store soon.

Flashkus (via Wired)

Special Gloves for Handling Your Camera in Cold Weather

If you find yourself often shooting in cold weather and having to take your right hand glove off to operate your camera, you might want to check out Freehands gloves. These are special gloves that have thumb and index finger tips that fold back, allowing you to adjust your camera settings without having to expose the useless parts of your hand to the cold. They range from $18 to $80 and can be ordered directly from the Freehands website.

Freehands (via PhotoWalkPro)

How to Use the Pen Tool in Photoshop

Have you always wondered how to use the Pen Tool in Photoshop but have never gotten around to learning it? f stoppers published this uber-informative video tutorial by Sean Armenta teaching how it’s used and why it’s a tool that everyone should learn. The teaching is done on a Mac, so if you have a PC, just substitute CTRL for CMD and ALT for OPT.

Protect Your Photos by Learning the Sounds of a Failing Hard Drive

External hard drives are a convenient way to store your digital photographs, but they have finite lifetimes and eventually fail. Failing drives have a number of distinctive sounds that can warn you and give you some time to start a data-exodus to a healthier hard drive. Datacent, a data recovery company, has a useful page on which you can listen to some of the most common “bad drive sounds”. These are categorized by manufacturer, and include things like stuck spindles, disk heads crashing, accessing bad sectors, and bad bearings. If your drive makes any of these sounds while your photographs are still accessible, begin evasive maneuversimmediately!

Hard drive sounds (via Boing Boing)


Image credit: Drive Destruction 11 by Nedster78