Posts Tagged ‘useful’

Samsung Working on Overlay Feature to Help Strangers Snap Better Shots of You

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Asking a stranger to snap a photograph of you is a risky proposition. If the person has no concept of basic photography concepts and techniques, the resulting photographs may be completely different than what you had hoped for — and you’re too embarrassed to ask for another photo (so you wait for that person to leave and for a new one to walk by).

Samsung wants to help solve this problem: they’re working on a camera feature that helps guide photo-inept strangers in snapping the shot you want.
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PhotoExif Helps You Record EXIF Data for Film Photos On the Go

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One of the advantages of digital photography is having information about how each photo was shot embedded within the photograph’s file itself. This EXIF data is something photographers commonly jot down in notebooks as they walk around and shoot with their analog cameras.

Photographer Oriol Garcia wanted a better solution than manually writing down shot times and details. Since most people have smartphones now, why not make an extremely easy to use app that can document the info of every photograph taken? He ended up creating an app called PhotoExif that can do just that.
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A Chrome Extension for Looking Up the Histogram of Any Online Photograph

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A couple of weeks ago we featured a Google Chrome extension for overlaying “rule of thirds” lines over any online photograph. Now we have a different tool for examining other photographer’s photographs: Image Histogram.

Created by developer/photographer Nick Burlett, it’s a Chrome Extension that can quickly bring up the histogram of any online photograph.
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Use “Focus Peaking” in Photoshop to Select In-Focus Areas of a Photo

Last week, we wrote about an emerging digital camera feature called “focus peaking”, which lets users easily focus lenses through live view by using colorful pixels to highlight in-focus areas. Photographer Karel Donk wanted the same feature in Photoshop, which doesn’t currently offer it, so he decided to create it himself.
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Make a Film Roll Bandolier to Make Sure You Never Run Out of Shots

Bandoliers are pocketed belts made for holding ammunition. They’re often seen in action and war movies, slung over the chests of tough guys holding big guns. If you’d like to ensure that you never run out of photographic ammo (AKA film) when you’re out and about, you can make yourself a nifty DIY film ammo strap. Photojojo says that these are inspired by old school camera straps that come with elastic film loops, but we definitely think you should go the extra mile and turn them into full-blown bandoliers.

What you’ll need is some fabric and elastic, a key ring to serve as a connector, and some sewing tools and skills. While it’s designed to be attached to your belt or to the strap mount on your camera, adding some extra length to it can turn it into a belt/bandolier. Head on over to Photojojo for the low-down on how to put this thing together!

How to Make a Film Ammo Strap [Photojojo]


P.S. We’ve written multiple times before on how there’s a historical link between guns and cameras. Many techniques are interchangeable, there’s shared terminology, and rifle butts have been used as camera stabilizers throughout history
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FilterCalc: An Android App for Calculating the Exposure Offsets of Filters

Still shoot film? Use filters when you shoot? FilterCalc is a new Android app that’s designed to help non-TTL photographers figure out proper exposure when using filters.

This base ISO exposure calculator comes with preloaded database of almost 500 filters. By selecting the actual ISO value and filter type, the app computes base ISO to be used with the light meter resulting in proper exposure.

FilterCalc can compute ISO compensation in increments of 1/3, 1/2, 2/3 and full stop EV. You can select compensation values by stops, by filter factor, by preloaded filter brand/type, or add your own custom data.

The app is free and can be downloaded over on Google Play.

FilterCalc [Google Play]

Virtual Lighting Studio: An Online Studio Lighting Simulator

Virtual Lighting Studio is an awesome new free studio lighting simulator that doesn’t require any installation — you use it directly in your browser. It offers a large number of options for customizing your setup (e.g. number of lights, light type, gel, positioning) and the result is updated in real-time on the virtual model’s head.

Virtual Lighting Studio (via Strobist)

Posing App: A Handy Photographer’s Reference for Portrait Poses

Posing App is a new app that offers a pocket reference for poses — helpful for both photographers and models. The 140 hand-drawn poses come in a variety of flavors — children, couples, weddings, and women, to name a few — and are accompanied by short descriptions that provide additional pointers. The is available from the iTunes App Store for $2, and will be released for Android soon.

Use Your Coffee Cup to Predict Whether Rain Will Ruin Your Outdoor Shoot

Did you know that your morning cup of coffee can help you predict rain? It’s a trick used by backpackers that can come in handy you’re shooting outdoors without Internet: pour a cup of coffee and carefully watch the bubbles. Backpacker Magazine writes,

If the bubbles amass in the center, you’re in a high-pressure system, which is making the coffee’s surface convex (higher in the middle). Since bubbles are mostly air, they migrate to the highest point. It’s going to be a beautiful day. If the bubbles form a ring around the sides of the mug, you’re in a low-pressure system, making the surface concave. Rain is likely. Note: It has to be strong, brewed coffee to have enough oil to work, and the mug must have straight sides.

To make new bubbles, simply give your coffee a good stir.

(via Backpacker Magazine via Instructables via Lifehacker)


Image credit: drip by subsetsum

Nokia’s 41-Megapixel Camera Phone Sensor Compared to Other Sensors

Here’s a great diagram by Mobot that shows how the 41-megapixel sensor inside Nokia’s new 808 PureView phone stacks up against other popular sensor sizes. It’s pretty clear that they didn’t just milk a small sensor for more megapixels as a simply marketing ploy, but instead came up with a sensor that’s significantly larger than those found in other smartphones. Engadget also has a photo showing a comparison of sensor sizes, while Digital Trends has published an article on five reasons why the 41-megapixels isn’t a gimmick.

(via Mobot via PhotographyBLOG)