Posts Tagged ‘useful’

HACKxTACK: A Magnetic Lens Cap Holder that Ensures You Never Lose Yours Again

If there’s one thing I lose more than anything else while shooting, it’s lens caps. I’ve never permanently lost one (knock on wood), but I’ve certainly misplaced them for days at a time. And I have a feeling I’m not the only one who’s guilty of this.

Here to help us through our absentmindedness is a new Kickstarter for a product called HACKxTACK. Read more…

Mark II Artist’s Viewfinder App Simulates Lens and Camera Setups on Your iPhone

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DIRE Studio has released an application for photographers and cinematographers alike that they’ve aptly named Mark II Artist’s Viewfinder.

Aptly named because, while capable of being used as a camera app, the app’s main attraction is its ability to simulate, preview and capture the viewfinders of hundreds of camera and lens combinations, all from the screen of your iPhone. Read more…

Video: Ten Photography Life Hacks That’ll Save You Money

We’ve shared a few pretty cool life hacks over the years — for example, check out this super-simple drop test that’ll let you know if your AA batteries are juiced and ready to go — but the video above brings together some of the most useful.

Put together by DigitalRev, these ten photo-related life hacks have the potential to make your photographic life that much easier, while saving you some money as well. Read more…

Samsung Working on Overlay Feature to Help Strangers Snap Better Shots of You

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Asking a stranger to snap a photograph of you is a risky proposition. If the person has no concept of basic photography concepts and techniques, the resulting photographs may be completely different than what you had hoped for — and you’re too embarrassed to ask for another photo (so you wait for that person to leave and for a new one to walk by).

Samsung wants to help solve this problem: they’re working on a camera feature that helps guide photo-inept strangers in snapping the shot you want.
Read more…

PhotoExif Helps You Record EXIF Data for Film Photos On the Go

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One of the advantages of digital photography is having information about how each photo was shot embedded within the photograph’s file itself. This EXIF data is something photographers commonly jot down in notebooks as they walk around and shoot with their analog cameras.

Photographer Oriol Garcia wanted a better solution than manually writing down shot times and details. Since most people have smartphones now, why not make an extremely easy to use app that can document the info of every photograph taken? He ended up creating an app called PhotoExif that can do just that.
Read more…

A Chrome Extension for Looking Up the Histogram of Any Online Photograph

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A couple of weeks ago we featured a Google Chrome extension for overlaying “rule of thirds” lines over any online photograph. Now we have a different tool for examining other photographer’s photographs: Image Histogram.

Created by developer/photographer Nick Burlett, it’s a Chrome Extension that can quickly bring up the histogram of any online photograph.
Read more…

Use “Focus Peaking” in Photoshop to Select In-Focus Areas of a Photo

Last week, we wrote about an emerging digital camera feature called “focus peaking”, which lets users easily focus lenses through live view by using colorful pixels to highlight in-focus areas. Photographer Karel Donk wanted the same feature in Photoshop, which doesn’t currently offer it, so he decided to create it himself.
Read more…

Make a Film Roll Bandolier to Make Sure You Never Run Out of Shots

Bandoliers are pocketed belts made for holding ammunition. They’re often seen in action and war movies, slung over the chests of tough guys holding big guns. If you’d like to ensure that you never run out of photographic ammo (AKA film) when you’re out and about, you can make yourself a nifty DIY film ammo strap. Photojojo says that these are inspired by old school camera straps that come with elastic film loops, but we definitely think you should go the extra mile and turn them into full-blown bandoliers.

What you’ll need is some fabric and elastic, a key ring to serve as a connector, and some sewing tools and skills. While it’s designed to be attached to your belt or to the strap mount on your camera, adding some extra length to it can turn it into a belt/bandolier. Head on over to Photojojo for the low-down on how to put this thing together!

How to Make a Film Ammo Strap [Photojojo]


P.S. We’ve written multiple times before on how there’s a historical link between guns and cameras. Many techniques are interchangeable, there’s shared terminology, and rifle butts have been used as camera stabilizers throughout history
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FilterCalc: An Android App for Calculating the Exposure Offsets of Filters

Still shoot film? Use filters when you shoot? FilterCalc is a new Android app that’s designed to help non-TTL photographers figure out proper exposure when using filters.

This base ISO exposure calculator comes with preloaded database of almost 500 filters. By selecting the actual ISO value and filter type, the app computes base ISO to be used with the light meter resulting in proper exposure.

FilterCalc can compute ISO compensation in increments of 1/3, 1/2, 2/3 and full stop EV. You can select compensation values by stops, by filter factor, by preloaded filter brand/type, or add your own custom data.

The app is free and can be downloaded over on Google Play.

FilterCalc [Google Play]

Virtual Lighting Studio: An Online Studio Lighting Simulator

Virtual Lighting Studio is an awesome new free studio lighting simulator that doesn’t require any installation — you use it directly in your browser. It offers a large number of options for customizing your setup (e.g. number of lights, light type, gel, positioning) and the result is updated in real-time on the virtual model’s head.

Virtual Lighting Studio (via Strobist)