Posts Tagged ‘unique’

Pinhole Camera Made from a Pine Nut

Transforming foods into pinhole cameras appears to be one of the popular trends. We already shared the egg pinhole camera, and now here’s the pine nut pinhole camera. Italian photography student Francesco Capponi created this tiny camera by painting the inside of the shell black, poking a hole in one side, loading it with a piece of photographic paper, and using his thumb as a shutter. He calls it the “PinHolo”, a play on words since “pinolo” is Italian for “pine nut”.
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Still Photos with a Dash of Movement

Photographer Jamie Beck has a beautiful series of images that she calls “cinemagraphs“. They’re animated GIFs in which only a small piece each photograph is animated, making them a neat fusion of still and moving images. It’s amazing how much a tiny bit of movement in a still photo can do. They’re almost like the moving pictures you see in Harry Potter!
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Eggs Transformed into Pinhole Cameras

Francesco Capponi was inspired yesterday (AKA Easter and World Pinhole Photography Day) to create pinhole cameras out of eggs. He painted the insides with emulsion to make it light-sensitive after drilling a hole, exposed it through a pinhole, then filled the egg with processing and fixing chemicals to develop the photo. You can find a full walkthrough of his process over on Lomography. The process isn’t easy — in creating four satisfactory photos Capponi ended up destroying fifty eggs!

The Pinhegg – My Journey To Build An Egg Pinhole Camera (via Make)

Gigapixel Time-lapse Videos Provide Window into Space and Time

You’ve probably seen gigapixel photos and timelapse videos before, but how about a fusion of the two? Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have a project called GigaPan Time Machine that features gigapixel time-lapse videos of things ranging from plants growing to a university carnival. They also set up a wiki describing how you can create your own time-lapse using a GigaPan Pro.

GigaPan Time Machine (via Engadget)

Limited Edition Case Turns Your Camera into a Bunny

Easter is just around the corner, and camera case maker ZKIN is selling these limited edition bunny-style Micro Four Thirds camera cases for a good cause. Only 101 of them were made, and proceeds of the sales will be donated to the Society for Abandoned Animals. They’re available from DCFever for 620 HKD (~$80).

Nazca (via Photojojo)

Homemade Medium Format Camera with 360 Degree Lens

Check out this bizarre looking homemade medium format camera spotted by tokyo camera style on the streets of Tokyo, Japan. That bizarre glass bulb you see sticking out of it is the 360 degree lens that projects panoramic views onto the 120 film inside the camera.
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Take Fun Portraits of Your Cat Using a Flatbed Scanner

Did you know that flatbed scanners make fun portrait cameras as well? Just place your cat on the glass, do a quick scan, and you’ll have a strange looking portrait shot from below! Apparently this is pretty popular among cat lovers — a Flickr search for “cat scanner” returns thousands of results! This gives “cat scan” a whole new meaning!

“Cat Scanner” (via Photojojo)


Image credit: Cat Scan! by Tabbymom Jen

Photographs of Old Televisions the Moment They’re Turned Off

Berlin-based photographer Stephan Tillmans shot a series of photographs titled “Luminant Point Arrays” that show old CRT televisions being switched off, capturing the strange and unique light patterns that appear for an instant but immediately vanish.
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Pinhole Cameras Made with Photo Paper

Photographer Thomas Hudson Reeve shoots pinhole photographs in a pretty interesting way — rather than using photo-sensitive paper or film inside a separate camera, he creates the camera using photo paper itself. The resulting photograph is exposed onto the inside of the photo-sensitive camera (which he calls the “PaperCam”), and creates a pretty surreal look when opened up and developed.
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DIY Ring Flash Created with Fiber Optics

No, this isn’t some advanced beam weapon from a sci-fi flick. It’s actually a do-it-yourself ring flash created using 150 optical fibers, with one end wrapped over the pop-up flash of the DSLR and the other end spitting out the photons in a ring-shape. If you want to learn how to make your own, here’s an in-depth writeup on how this was constructed.