Posts Tagged ‘tutorial’

How to Repair Old Photos Using Photoshop

Photoshop teacher Howard Pinsky shares this quick 9-minute video tutorial on how you can use Photoshop to repair old and damaged photos. The restoration is done using the Healing Brush, Spot Healing Brush, and Clone Stamp tools.

(via Howard Pinsky via Photofocus)

How to Use a B&W Layer in Photoshop to Adjust the Brightness of Colors In Photos

Travel photographer Jimmy McIntyre created this short 3-minute video tutorial to share a trick for adjusting the brightness of specific colors in your shot without affecting their saturation.
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Recreating the Look of Tintype Photography Using Photoshop

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The other night I came across the work of photographer Victoria Will, who made real tintype portraits of some actors who attended this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

The portraits themselves were excellent but what really drew me in was the effect of the tintype medium and the old lens and camera that was used to make the images; very narrow depth of field, low tonal range, and non-uniform exposure across the frame. I decided I wanted to see if I could replicate the look of tintype using my Sony A7R and some Photoshop massaging.
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A Quick Introduction to Shooting with a Tilt-Shift Lens

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A while back I got my hands on my first tilt-shift lens. Since then I have carried it with me nearly every day, grocery shopping and subway riding – you name it. It’s quite a special and fascinating piece of glass even having aged 43 years.
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How to Capture Stunning Star Trail Photos in Light Polluted Places

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I’ve always found photos of star trails — the arcs the stars paint across the sky as the earth turns — fascinating. They’re one of the things that we can “see” with a camera that we can’t see with our eyes. Technology has changed how we shoot star trails, making star trail shots in locations we previously thought impossible possible.
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How to Do Cinematic Color Grading on Your Photos with Photoshop

Want to give your photographs a “Hollywood movie” look? Here’s a fantastic 25-minute tutorial on how to do cinematic color grading on your photographs using Photoshop. The technique involves using the Curves tool to create a teal-orange look, a color scheme that is very prevalent in movies released in recent years.

Photoshop Training Channel writes: “This effect gives the dark shades of your image a cool teal tone, while the light shades take a warm orange look. This makes the actor stand out since the colors are complementary and create a ‘pop’ when put side by side.”

(via Photoshop Training Channel via Reddit)

Lighting Fundamentals: High Speed Sync Versus Flash Duration

If you’re just getting started in learning how to light your shot with flashes, you may be confused about the terms “high speed sync” and “flash duration.” Here’s a helpful 6-minute primer in which photographer Daniel Norton explains what these two concepts are, how they differ, and which situations they come in handy for.
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A Trick for Sharpening High ISO Photos in Photoshop Without Adding More Noise

UK-based glamour photographer Markp created this short video tutorial on how he sharpens photos captured at high ISOs in Photoshop without adding more noise to the image. His technique involves creating a High Pass duplicate layer of the photo, desaturating it and reducing noise on it, sharpening that layer, and then blending it into the original photo with Photoshop’s “Linear Light” blend mode.

(via Mashup Mark via Reddit)

Enhance the Eyes in Wildlife Photos to Add Some Pop

Steve Perry of Backcountry Gallery offers this short Photoshop tutorial on how you can enhance the eyes of your wildlife subjects and make them pop. He uses a Curves layer, a layer mask, and a brush to paint in some brightness. “When it comes to wildlife, it’s all about the eyes,” Perry says. Now that’s a bright eyed deer.

How to Easily Correct Colors in Old Photos Using the Levels Tool in Photoshop

Photoshop’s Auto Color adjustment is a simple way to color correct a photo in just a couple of clicks, but it doesn’t always produce the look you’re going for. Here’s a short tutorial on another easy way to do color correction that puts a little more control back in your hands without making things difficult.

Photoshop expert Matt Kloskowski shows how you can use the Levels tool for easy color tweaks. You’ll need to make adjustments in each individual color channel and use the histogram to eyeball your fixes.

(via CreativeLive via ISO 1200)