Posts Tagged ‘trippy’

Trippy: Video of a Man Walking Backwards Through Tokyo Played in Reverse

When you first play the clip above, you might wonder why this guy is the only one walking normally in a world of backwards walking people and backwards driving cars… and then it hits you: he’s the one walking backwards, and the video is being played in reverse. Read more…

Hitchcock Zoom and Slit Scan Photography Combined Make for a Psychedelic Effect

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French photographer Micaël Reynaud first made it onto the blog in in May of 2012 when he created a trippy-but-cool example of what the dolly zoom (also known as the Hitchcock zoom) looked like when stretched to its extremes. Read more…

Making a Rotating Room Set for a Gravity Defying Shoot for Just $350

North Webster, Indiana-based photographer and videographer Justin Fredrick Clark recently shared this awesome behind-the-scenes video showing how he and some other guys at his church built a rotating room for just $350 (granted, they already had access to some pretty serious equipment) for a creative work project.
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Mind-Bending Time-Lapse of Cityscapes Mirrored Into Kaleidoscopic Patterns

Photographer Michael Shainblum has been mirroring images and video for about five years now. So when he decided to explore the world of time-lapse, that naturally meant exploring it in Kaleidoscopic fashion. The result was the psychedelic cityscape time-lapse Mirror City. Read more…

Trippy Mirrored Hyperlapse Videos Shot on Japanese Monorail Systems

Mirroring your time-lapse footage can yield a trippy, ethereal quality to an otherwise standard video. Riding on the Japanese monorail, for example, is nothing particularly special. Creating a hyperlapse of the experience, while cool, probably won’t stand out.

A few users, however, have come up with some interesting takes on a monorail hyperlapse by mirroring the footage and taking you on a much stranger journey. Read more…

Photo Recursion Effect with Smartphones in a Circle

When Toronto-based photo enthusiast Alexander Kolomietz had a birthday party recently, he asked his guests to stand in a circle, pull out their smartphones, and simultaneously snap a photo of the LCD screen on the next camera in the circle. Kolomietz then collected the resulting photographs and turned them into the photo recursion effect seen in this video.

Mind-Bending Recursive Illusion Created Using Printed Photographs

Whoa. If you enjoy watching mind-bending concepts that confuse you and make your brain hurt, check out this experimental short by Willie Witte, titled “Screengrab.”

Nothing in the video is computer generated trickery: it simply uses clever camera tricks and a whole lotta printed photographs to create the seamless transitions. “All the trickery took place literally in front of the camera,” Witte says. See if you can understand what’s going on through the entire 1 minute and 30 seconds.
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Trippy Video Shows How a Person’s Face Changes Depending on the Lighting

Want to see how much of an effect the direction and color of your lighting has on your portrait subject’s face? Check out this trippy video by Nacho Guzman, who used a moving light and changing colors to cause a woman’s face to look like it’s constantly morphing.
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Anamorphic Illusions Created Using High-Res Prints of Photos

YouTube illusion and science channel Brusspup recently did an anamorphic illusion project in which he photographed a few random objects resting on a piece of paper (e.g. a Rubik’s cube, a roll of tape, and a shoe), skewed them, printed them out as high-resolution prints, and then photographed them at an angle to make the prints look just like the original objects.
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Mind-Bending Reflection Portraits Shot Using a Wet Plate Camera

Last week we issued a challenge asking readers to shoot a creative mirror self-portrait using an alternative style of photography. Reader Agustin Barrutia took us up on that challenge, and created a pair of wet plate photographs that take the concept of “mirror self-portrait” to a new level (they’re unlike anything we’ve seen before). Both photographs are straight-out-of-camera wet plate photos that weren’t manipulated digitally. Barrutia simply used “mirrors” (one doesn’t involve a mirror, per se) and “reflections” in clever ways.

The wet plate above is a self-portrait of Barrutia shooting the wet plate. That camera in the frame is the camera that captured the wet plate.
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