Posts Tagged ‘trippy’

Super Trippy Abstract Time-Lapse Covers Everything from Riots to Decaying Roadkill

There are times where words don’t do a piece of artwork justice. Such is the case with Circle of Abstract Ritual: a trippy, creepy and downright weird time-lapse by artist Jeff Frost.

It consists of 300k photos captured over the course of two years. In it you’ll see riots, wildfires, decaying roadkill, abandoned houses turned into giant canvases and far more, all of it combined into an abstractly contextualized piece of time-lapse artistry. Read more…

Trippy Glitch Photographs Blend Manual and Algorithmic ‘Accidents’ to Create Awesome Images

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We’ve showcased glitch photography before, both purposeful and accidental. Blurring the lines between science and art, glitch photography is often like a fingerprint, with each image being unique.

Today we have for you an awesome collection of these photographic fingerprints by artist and freelance photographer Sabato Visconti. Read more…

Camera & Sky Move as One in This Twisted Time-Lapse

It’s safe to say we’ve all seen our fair share of night-sky time-lapses. Most often, they tend to show off grandiose views of mother nature as the stars (seemingly) rotate in the background. But the truth of the matter is, we’re the ones rotating, not the stars.

So what would happen if a night-sky time-lapse photographer used the stars – or more precisely a star – as a fixed axis, instead of Earth? Well, you would end up with a trippy time-lapse like the one you see above. Read more…

Trippy: Video of a Man Walking Backwards Through Tokyo Played in Reverse

When you first play the clip above, you might wonder why this guy is the only one walking normally in a world of backwards walking people and backwards driving cars… and then it hits you: he’s the one walking backwards, and the video is being played in reverse. Read more…

Hitchcock Zoom and Slit Scan Photography Combined Make for a Psychedelic Effect

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French photographer Micaël Reynaud first made it onto the blog in in May of 2012 when he created a trippy-but-cool example of what the dolly zoom (also known as the Hitchcock zoom) looked like when stretched to its extremes. Read more…

Making a Rotating Room Set for a Gravity Defying Shoot for Just $350

North Webster, Indiana-based photographer and videographer Justin Fredrick Clark recently shared this awesome behind-the-scenes video showing how he and some other guys at his church built a rotating room for just $350 (granted, they already had access to some pretty serious equipment) for a creative work project.
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Mind-Bending Time-Lapse of Cityscapes Mirrored Into Kaleidoscopic Patterns

Photographer Michael Shainblum has been mirroring images and video for about five years now. So when he decided to explore the world of time-lapse, that naturally meant exploring it in Kaleidoscopic fashion. The result was the psychedelic cityscape time-lapse Mirror City. Read more…

Trippy Mirrored Hyperlapse Videos Shot on Japanese Monorail Systems

Mirroring your time-lapse footage can yield a trippy, ethereal quality to an otherwise standard video. Riding on the Japanese monorail, for example, is nothing particularly special. Creating a hyperlapse of the experience, while cool, probably won’t stand out.

A few users, however, have come up with some interesting takes on a monorail hyperlapse by mirroring the footage and taking you on a much stranger journey. Read more…

Photo Recursion Effect with Smartphones in a Circle

When Toronto-based photo enthusiast Alexander Kolomietz had a birthday party recently, he asked his guests to stand in a circle, pull out their smartphones, and simultaneously snap a photo of the LCD screen on the next camera in the circle. Kolomietz then collected the resulting photographs and turned them into the photo recursion effect seen in this video.

Mind-Bending Recursive Illusion Created Using Printed Photographs

Whoa. If you enjoy watching mind-bending concepts that confuse you and make your brain hurt, check out this experimental short by Willie Witte, titled “Screengrab.”

Nothing in the video is computer generated trickery: it simply uses clever camera tricks and a whole lotta printed photographs to create the seamless transitions. “All the trickery took place literally in front of the camera,” Witte says. See if you can understand what’s going on through the entire 1 minute and 30 seconds.
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