Posts Tagged ‘trick’

Olympus OM-D EM-5′s Art Filter Works Nicely as a Focus Peaking Feature

For those of you who are desperate for Olympus to release a focus peaking feature for the OM-D EM-5, did you know that there’s a trick you can use for “ghetto focus peaking”?

A French photographer named Nicolas recently found that the camera’s “Key Line” Art Filter actually works quite well as a focus peaking feature. Simply turn on the filter, set your camera to shoot RAW+JPEG, and focus/shoot away. You can throw away the artsy-filtered JPEG files afterward, but the RAW photographs will be precisely focused thanks to the clever “hack”!
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Commercial Features Water Drops Frozen With Sound and the Camera’s Frame Rate

Earlier this year, we shared a crazy example of how you can make water drops look like they’re frozen in midair simply by passing the water over a speaker and using sound vibrations to sync the drops with the frame rate of your camera. Well, Japan’s largest music channel, Space Shower TV, has taken the idea and turned it into clever commercial. What you see above is ordinary footage using this trick — there’s no fancy CGI trickery, reversal during post, or high-speed camera footage involved.
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How to Use Your iPhone as a Quick and Easy Negative Viewer

If you do any darkroom work, you probably regularly print contact sheets to peek at the positive versions of your B&W negative film strips. Did you know that your iPhone can be used as a quick an easy tool for this same purpose?
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Instead of Selling Your Old Stroller, Use it to Haul Around Camera Gear

Don’t have any more babies to transport? Old strollers can be repurposed as a way to wheel your camera gear from place to place. Just load it up with your camera bag, tripod, lighting equipment, and accessories, and you’ll have yourself a mobile mini studio.
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Trick: Easily Set Photos to “Private” in iOS by Cropping Them Down

If you own an iOS device, you’ve probably noticed that the Camera Roll in the native Photos app doesn’t come with any way to mark photographs as private. For this reason, the App Store features a large number of apps (both paid and free) designed to offer that feature, allowing you to choose what to show and what not to when someone else is flipping through your photographs. If you want an easy way to “mark photos as private” without having to download a special app (or pay money for a fancy one), Amit Agarwal over at Digital Inspiration offers this simple trick: crop them.
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Gravity-Defying Shots Created Using a Featureless Room

For its 2010 lookbook, Swedish fashion brand Courtrai Apparel created some gravity-defying shots of a guy floating in a featureless room. Rather than use fancy computer trickery, they used the same perspective trick as the Carl Kleiner project we shared a couple days ago.
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How to Detach a Photograph That Has Been Glued

If you ever need to remove a photograph that has been glued to paper or cardboard, you can try using the same trick that stamp collectors use: soaking in water. Amateur photographer Michael T. Lauer writes on Quora,

Photos are processed in water so they can stay in water for a fairly long time. A lot of glue is not waterproof so it will lose strength in water. So, I’d approach this by soaking a print with paper backing in a tray with water (at room temperature) for 20-30 minutes. Take the print out of the water and lay it on a piece of rigid glass or plastic face down. Try to work the paper off the print by lifting at the edges. This part is trial and error.

After completing the work on the back, clean (squeegee) the glass/plastic and dip the print briefly in the water bath. Place the print on the glass face-up and squeegee the surface so that it’s free of water drops (this will prevent spotting). Place the print on a drying screen (a screen like what is used in a window but not metal) face down and leave it where air can circulate around it to dry over night.

Lauer warns against using heat or physical removal of the glue and paper, as both techniques could cause damage to the print.

Should I detach old photographs that have been glued to construction paper, and if so how? [Quora]


Image credit: Old Family Photos by amishsteve

The Red Hallway Trick: Using a Colored Gel to Spice Up Your Background

Here’s a short and sweet video in which photographer/entrepreneur Gary Fong shares his “red hallway” trick for turning a drab background into something colorful. The basic idea is to trick your camera into thinking the world is a certain color by doing custom white balancing with a colored gel in front of the lens. Once you have the WB set, use the gel over your flash to color balance your subject while the background is transformed.

Use Your Hand as a Makeshift Gray Card for Estimating Exposure

Peter West Carey of DPS has a neat trick for always having a gray card “at hand”: he suggests using your hand as a gray card when you don’t have a card handy. You’ll need to start with an actual gray card for “calibration”:

In a nice even light, using spot metering and manual exposure mode, point your camera at the gray card. Set your ISO so it is not on Auto and maybe to 800, the number isn’t too important. Now adjust aperture and shutter speed until the camera metering is at zero, meaning it is not over or underexposed according to the camera. Next place your hand (I suggest your left hand) where the card was, with your fingers together. Ensure the center metering spot is completely covered by your hand.

What does the camera’s meter read now? Mine says the settings I had for the gray card are 2/3rds of a stop too dark for my hand. [...] This means whenever I point the spot metering at my hand, and my hand is in the light hitting my subject, I just have to adjust my settings until my camera thinks the exposure is 2/3rds of a stop too dark and I am set!

So basically, since the color and tone of your palms don’t change very much, you can use the difference between your hand and 18% gray for snap exposure judgements while shooting.

How To Always Keep A Gray Card At Hand [DPS]


Image credit: Hand by mnsc

Use a Nail and Clothespin to Determine Placement When Hanging Photos

Michele over at The Scrap Shoppe offers this handy trick for hanging picture frames: hammer a nail through a clothespin and use it to determine nail placement. Simply hang the picture on the clothespin nail, figure out where you want to place the frame, and then push the clothespin into the wall to make a small indent. Voila! Target acquired.

Picture Frame Hanging Tip (via Lifehacker)


P.S. Last month we shared a similar trick that uses toothpaste.


Image credits: Photographs by Michele/The Scrap Shoppe