Posts Tagged ‘trend’

The Latest Instagram Trend is Called ‘Baby Suiting,’ and It’s Actually Kinda Cute

BabySuitingWebstagramOverview

Are you looking for a creative new way to photograph your newborn at home AND you like to be part of the newest social media trends? Well you’re in luck, because a new thing called “Baby Suiting” is sweeping the Instagram nation right now. Read more…

Emerging Trend: “Instagram Moments” at Fashion Shows

instamoment

New trend alert: Eric Wilson of the New York Times reports that fashion shows are starting to have built-in “Instagram moments,” in which models stop to pose for unofficial Instagram snaps:

[...] runway shows are hard to photograph, especially from the sidelines using a cellphone. A lot of people miss the shows entirely, so focused are they on taking pictures that are almost always out of focus. It all becomes a blur.

At the end of Prabal Gurung’s show this afternoon, however, all of the models walked onto the runway and stopped, each one taking a position under a spotlight and standing there for several seconds, offering an opportunity for editors to get a good shot. The same thing happened at the Creatures of the Wind show on Thursday. Call it the Instagram moment.

An Instagram Moment [NYTimes]


Image credit: Girls n boys in tech fashion show is surprisingly awesome. Go #HackNY #RaiseCache! by dpstyles™

More Than One Quarter of All Photos Now Taken with Smartphones

Smartphones are taking huge bites out of the compact camera market. A recent study by market research company NPD found that the percent of photographs taken with a smartphone has increased from 17% to 27% over the past year, while the share of photos taken with a dedicated camera has dropped from 52% to 44%. Senior imaging analyst Liz Cutting says,

There is no doubt that the smartphone is becoming ‘good enough’ much of the time; but thanks to mobile phones, more pictures are being taken than ever before. Consumers who use their mobile phones to take pictures and video were more likely to do so instead of their camera when capturing spontaneous moments, but for important events, single purpose cameras or camcorders are still largely the device of choice.

The point-and-shoot camera market is taking the brunt of the damage: during the first 11 months of 2011, the market lost 17% in units sold and 18% in revenue.

(via NPD via Wired)


Image credit: Image by The NPD Group/Imaging Confluence Study 2011

It’s Not Just Phones: Tablets Are Trying to Replace Compact Cameras As Well

Guess what camera was used to shoot the photograph above? A tablet computer. It was shot using the new ASUS Eee Pad Transformer Prime tablet, which features a camera with a 8-megapixel back-illuminated CMOS sensor, an f/2.4 autofocus lens, an LED flash, and 1080p HD video recording. Looks like we’ll soon be seeing a lot more people whip out tablets for everyday snapshots.
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“Horsemaning” is the Latest Photo Fad

Another week, another strange photo fad. The latest one is “horsemaning”, and involves photographing two people to look like one decapitated person (like the headless horseman). Apparently it started in the early 1920s with the photo seen above, and is making a comeback as of late.
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“Planking” Photos Becoming a Major Fad

Planking (AKA the “lying down game“) is a growing fad that involves lying face down in strange places with your arms to the side and snapping a photograph of it.
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Nikon Chief Believes Digital Camera Market Nearly Saturated

Nikon’s new president Makoto Kimura believes that the explosive growth of the digital camera market is ending, and that the market is near its saturation point.

Kimura was previously the head of Nikon’s imaging business and instrumental in leading the company from its film photography business to the new world of digital.

At a news conference in Tokyo today, Kimura stated,

Nikon’s imaging business has been expanding quite steadily over the past 10 years. ‘But can it enjoy the same stable growth for the next 10 years? The answer is no,’ Growth for existing digital camera products will inevitably slow and they are set to move into a phase of saturation. I intend to keep dialogue open for everyone to decide what we should do to achieve further growth despite this trend.

Digital photography exploded between 2000 and 2010, with compact cameras being widely adopted and DSLRs becoming more and more accessible to ordinary consumers. Kimura believes that camera companies will now need to look for new directions to grow besides introducing digital cameras to new users.

What do you think will characterize this next decade in digital photography?

PMA 2010: Underwater Point-and-Shoot Cameras a Trend this Year

Underwater housing units for DSLR bodies can cost upwards of $1499 at most distributors. Waterproof cases for point-and-shoots already average $150. But this year, a major trend in most camera companies is the point-and-shoot designed for underwater use and toss-around durability at a competitive cost.

Around the show at PMA 2010, almost every major point-and-shoot manufacturer had a new array of cameras ready for surf, sand, snow and hard falls.

Here’s a sampling:

Olympus

8010_front

Scott Hennessey and the crew at Olympus let me shoot around the booth with a prototype of the Olympus Stylus Tough 8010, which is due for release this March for about $399.

This camera was particularly noteworthy because as far as I could tell, it’s got the ability to remain watertight up to 33 feet underwater, while most other brands ranged between 10-16 feet.

It is also shockproof for a drop up to 6.6. feet, freezeproof at 14 degrees Fahrenheit, and crushproof (LCD and all), able to withstand up to 220 pounds of pressure; it will take a lot to kill this camera.

And standard for a lot of point-and-shoots, this camera shoots 14 megapixel stills and  720p movies.

I took a few images with the Tough 8010 in the water at the Olympus booth. The first one is of the other Olympus waterproof camera, the Stylus Tough 3000 which is a bit more standard, waterproof up to 10 feet and shockproof to 5 feet and a price tag of $229:

Samsung

Samsung’s AQ100 waterproof camera looks pretty fresh, available in black, aqua blue, and red. It’s slim with a 0.78 inch thickness, and will sell for about $199 this spring.

Sony

Sony’s stylish Cybershot TX5 has one of the cleanest designs for a shockproof (5 ft), waterproof (10ft) and freezeproof (14 F) camera. It’s also dust-resistant and has a touchscreen.

Casio

The Casio Exilim EX-G1 is also pretty heavy duty, surviving falls of up to seven feet. It’s also waterproof to 10 ft, dustproof, and freeze proof to 14 F. It’s also got software built in for easy uploads to YouTube.

Other Waterproof and Durability Gear

Also at the show, several companies, such as Delkin Devices, showed off their new accessories to compliment waterproof, durable cameras.

The Delkin Devices Jellyfish is basically a pouch for a small point and shoot, coupled with a floating ball. It’s simple, with a little fun: the flotation device includes a little bottle opener.

For more practical use, Delkin has also released a super durable CF card called the Combat Flash:

The Combat Flash capacity ranges from 4GB to 32 GB, and boasts a fast transfer speed at 91 mb/s, 625 x. It has sealed components to protect from moisture or submersion, can last at an altitude of 80,000 feet, and can withstand temperatures from -58 degrees F to 212 degrees F. It can also handle most shock and gunfire vibration.

Prices range from $84 – $329.

No word yet on whether they’re developing an SD version (obviously, durability works much better with CF cards), but they do have a shock and weatherproof tote for 8 SD cards:

Digital Cameras With Detached LCDs

We’ve been seeing this idea floating around in concept cameras and new camera accessories, so it might be a coming trend in digital photography: detached LCD screens.

Xi Zhu Concept Camera

This isn’t an actual product, but rather a concept camera by designer Xi Zhu. The idea is that while the LCD and camera are normally held together with magnets, the LCD can also be detached and held by the subject of the photograph, allowing them to instantly view the photos, and delete those they don’t approve of. The photographer shoots through the optical viewfinder, and doesn’t actually get to see the resulting photographs, delegating chimping responsibilities to the subject.

Pixel LV-WI Wireless Live View Remote Control

Unlike the above concept, LV-W1 Wireless Live View Remote Control by Pixel Enterprise Limited is an actual product you can buy for your DSLR (for $335). Though the photographer can still see instant feedback on their camera, the remote receives the Live View wireless through the 2.4GHz band and displays it on a 3 inch screen. It works by attaching a transmitter to the camera’s hotshoe, and allows you to operate the shutter remotely.

This can also be done through your iPhone or iPod Touch using onOne Software’s DSLR Camera Remote application, though this app requires wifi and a laptop.

(via Yanko Design and Engadget)


Thanks for the tip @eugenephoto!