Posts Tagged ‘transfer’

How to Print Your Photos Onto Wood

woodphoto

Photographs printed onto wood are hangable, durable, and sustainable. The technique I use at Wood Craft Photos involves printing the image onto a special film, preparing a wood panel with custom gel medium, and then combining, leaving the wood grain in the light colored areas of the image showing through.

Here’s a step-by-step tutorial on how you can use this process yourself for beautiful wood prints.
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How to Transfer a Photograph Onto Glass Using Contact Paper

About a year ago, we shared a neat DIY method of transferring black-and-white photos onto blocks of wood. A very similar technique can be used for displaying your photos on glass. Inspired Ideas writes that all you need are a toner-based print of your photo (e.g. using a copier or laser printer) and some clear contact paper.

Sticking the contact paper to your print will transfer the toner from your ordinary paper to the sticky transparent film. The next step is to soak the two connected sheets in water, which softens up the white paper and allows it to be rubbed off. What you’re left with is a piece of wet transparent contact paper that features your photo. Let it dry to restore its stickiness, and then attach the resulting “sticker” to whatever you’d like to show off your photo on (e.g. glass jars, candle holders, windows etc.)

Making Memory Candles [Inspired Ideas via Photojojo]

Transfer Photos from Your Phone to Your Computer With Just a Bump

If you’ve been using smartphones for any length of time you’ve probably heard of Bump, the app that allows you to transfer photos and contact information between two phones with a simple… well… bump. And now they’ve expanded their functionality to include a website/webapp that makes transferring photos from your phone to your computer a breeze.

All you have to do if you already have the app is log on to bu.mp, select the photos you would like to transfer from your phone, and bump the phone against the space bar (although we’re pretty sure you could just hit the spacebar with any apendage…). After that you can download them straight to your computer to get them off Bump’s servers or share them with your friends via permalink. There’s not much “professional” application here, but it’s a great way to quickly transfer photos from your phone to your desktop when you’re in a bind.

Bump (via Lifehacker)

Tape Transfer Portraits Show Subjects Behind Their Own Altered Photos

Photographer Rory White‘s Rorshak Tape Transfer Series might look like some kind of surreal digital art, but the images were actually created without Photoshop. White shot portraits of his subjects, printed them out, and invited the subjects to paint, tear, and alter the prints. He then covered the image with packing tape, dropped it in hot water, and peeled off the paper on the back (like a Polaroid emulsion transfer). The semi-transparent image would then be hung from a stand, and the subject rephotographed while standing behind it.
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Magic Cable Trio: One USB Cable to Rule Them All

Tired of packing a huge mess of cables every time you go on a trip? The Magic Cable Trio is a 3-in-1 cable designed to cut down on your clutter. It lets you power and sync a wide range of devices ranging from phones, iOS systems (e.g. the iPad), music players, and compact cameras. Just make sure your device uses miniUSB, microUSB, or an iPhone dock connector. The three connections are daisy-chained, making it uber-compact and easy to manage. They cost $20 over at Innergie.

Magic Cable Trio (via Wired)

How to Make Your Own Canvas Print

Earlier this month we shared a hugely popular post on transferring a photo onto a block of wood. Well, the same technique can also be used to create a canvas print. All you need, besides the stretched canvas, is some gel medium and a photo printed with toner (e.g. made with a laser printer or photocopier). The gel medium is used to “steal” the toner from the paper, and once the paper is rubbed away, the print remains. Check out the full tutorial over on A Beautiful Mess.

Make Your Own Canvas Portrait! [A Beautiful Mess]


P.S. Be sure to check out the wood transfer tutorial if you haven’t seen it already. It’d make for a neat gift for the holidays!

How to Transfer a Photograph Onto a Block of Wood

Here’s a quick and easy tutorial that’ll teach you a cool method of transferring a photo print (black and white or color) onto a block of wood.
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Toshiba Unveils Wireless SD Card, Joins Eye-Fi in the Revolution

Here’s some good news for people who find memory card readers and data cables a hassle — Toshiba has unveiled a new “FlashAir” SDHC memory card with built-in wireless LAN functionality. It’s similar to Eye-Fi‘s offerings, but Toshiba’s cards will offer something that Eye-Fi’s don’t: two-way transfer. This means they can not only send photos wirelessly, but receive photos as well — perfect for quickly exchanging photos on the go with a friend’s camera! You’ll be able to purchase the cards starting in February 2012.

(via Toshiba via Help Net Security)

What the ‘x’ Means When it Comes to Memory Card Speed

Instead of labeling their memory cards in MB/s, some manufacturers choose to use “Times” ratings (e.g. 8x, 12x, 20x, etc…). While it’s pretty clear that a higher number indicates faster speed, what exactly is the number a multiple of?
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Sony Incorporates TransferJet Tech into the Memory Stick

In early 2008 Sony unveiled a new technology called TransferJet that allows wireless data transfer. Now, Sony has begun incorporating the technology into its Memory Stick memory card format, enabling owners of Sony digital cameras to transfer data without needing any cables.

TransferJet is a technology that allows wireless data transfer at speeds that rival Wi-Fi, but only across a very short distance (3cm/1.25in). This means two TransferJet devices need to be essentially touching for transfer to work, but it also provides an element of security, since a thief would likely have to be able to steal your device physically before they could steal your data.

Some of you might be wondering what the difference is between TransferJet and Bluetooth. The main differences are transfer rate and range. Bluetooth transfers at up to 3 Mbit/s while TransferJet boasts 375 Mbit/s. The extremely limited range of TransferJet also solves many of the security issues that have plagued Bluetooth.

Sony loves to make their gadgets play well with one another, and you will begin seeing Vaio notebooks with TransferJet technology soon. Other computers may require special receivers to place your cameras on.

(via The Imaging Resource)