Posts Tagged ‘tools’

DOF Calculator Helps You Take Sharp Landscape Photos

DOF Calculator is an app for Android phones that helps you easily calculate depth of field and hyperfocal distances. Simply tell it your camera, lens, and aperture setting, and it’ll spit out the numbers you need for optimally sharp landscape photographs. You can download it for free by searching for “DOF Calculator” in the Android Market.

For a quick video tutorial on how hyperfocal distance works, check out this post.

DOF Calculator (via Lifehacker)

SunCalc Provides a Map View for Checking Sunlight and Golden Hour

SunCalc is a super-simple web app created with Google Maps and Javascript that helps you determine the best time to shoot depending on the quality of light you want in your photos.

You can see sun positions at sunrise, specified time and sunset. The thin orange curve is the current sun trajectory, and the yellow area around is the variation of sun trajectories during the year. The closer a point is to the center, the higher is the sun above the horizon. The colors on the time slider above show sunlight coverage during the day.

It was created by Vladimir Agafonkin. Similar apps include The Golden Hour Calculator and The Twilight Calculator.

Wirelessly Sync iPhone Photos to Your Computer with Cinq

iPhone photography continues to grow in popularity, but transferring photographs to your computer can be a hassle. If you’re sick of having to plug in your device via USB every time you want to sync your photos, you might want to take a look at Cinq, a free app that allows you to wireless transfer full-resolution photographs to your computer as you take them. You simply download the app to both your computer and your phone, and photos taken through the app will automatically be sent to a folder on your computer. The free version is ad-supported, while there’s an ad-free $2 version.

(via Wired)

Organize and Rename Your Photos Based on EXIF Data

AmoK Exif Sorter is a program written for photographers obsessed with organization, allowing a collection of photographs to be renamed and organized based on the EXIF data embedded in each photo. In addition to the obvious choices for details to include in the file name (e.g. time and date), you can also use any other piece of EXIF info you wish, including things like camera model, aperture, ISO, and shutter speed. For organization, the program allows you to copy or move files into whatever folder structure you’d like (i.e. /year/month/day/image.jpg). The program is free, Java-based, and can be downloaded here.

AmoK Exif Sorter (via Lifehacker)

Find the Golden Hour of Your Location with the Twilight Calculator

The Twilight Calculator is a free and useful web app that takes in your location and spits out a table with when you should photograph if you want to shoot during golden hour.

Real-Time Twitter Photo Search with Hashalbum

Twitter sees hundreds or thousands of Tweets published every second, and many of these are photos of things happening real-time. Hashalbum is a new website that aims to help you browse this constant stream of images in real time by allowing you to do a simple search by hashtag, returning images that are found in Tweets containing that hashtag.

Hashalbum (via Lifehacker)

Aviary Launches HTML5 Photo Editor for Flash-less Browsers

Aviary just launched a new HTML5 photo editor that lets you quickly and easily edit images without Flash. Third-party websites can also embed the editor, allowing images to be edited in place without having to visit Aviary’s website. The widget provides some basic features expected from image editors (e.g. cropping, brightness, contrast, saturation), but also some Hipstamatic-style image filters (instant, toy camera, old photo, retro) that style your photos with a single click.

HTML5 Editor (via Lifehacker)

Webinpaint is a Poor Man’s Web-Based Content Aware Fill Tool

Photoshop CS5′s Content Aware Fill feature was quite a hit when it came out earlier this year, but what about free alternatives? Webinpaint is a web-based photo app that aims to do just that. You simply open up an image, paint over the area you’d like removed, and click the “Inpaint” button for the app to do its removal magic.

From tests I’ve done with the app, it’s pretty clear it doesn’t come close to the power of Content Aware Fill. However, for simple photographs without much texture or clutter, the app actually works quite well.
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Easily Download Albums and Tagged Photos From Facebook Using Pick&Zip

Pick&Zip is a simple web application that lets you easily download Facebook photographs with a few clicks.

You can download photos tagged with your name, your own albums, photos tagged with friends’ names, or your friends’ albums. After selecting the photographs you’d like, you can download them as a ZIP or PDF file.

I just tried it out, and the service works pretty well, allowing you to pull photos at the highest resolution Facebook stores (720px) quickly to your computer without having to click and download individual photos.

Something that’s slightly annoying is that you can’t seem to download all possible photos with one click, but must “select all” on each individual page. The app is pretty useful, nonetheless.

Red iGone is a Simple Web-Based Red-Eye Reduction Tool

If you need to fix some red-eyes in a photo, but don’t have an image editor handy, Red iGone is a quick and easy way to get the eyes corrected. It’s a simple web-based application that requires only that you select the eyes to be corrected. After that, all you need to do is download the fixed photo.

Here’s an example photograph that we ran through the app:

We were pretty surprised at how well the adjustment worked. It’s a great app for when you only want to fix red eyes and nothing else. PicTreat also offers web-based red-eye reduction, but it touches up the rest of the photo as well.