Posts Tagged ‘tools’

Powerful New In-Browser Photo Editing Tools Added to Google+

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Snapseed’s team has been hard at work since their company was acquired by Google last September. They’ve already put new photo filters in the Google+ app and some auto-enhance tools in Google+, and now they’re working on something even grander: turning Google+ into a full-fledged, browser-based photo editing tool.
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Pics.io Wants to Bring RAW Photo Editing to a Browser Near You

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Traditionally, a photographer’s post-processing workflow does not include a web browser, but rather, tools like Lightroom and Aperture. Pics.io is hoping to change that, and is working to bring serious RAW picture editing and collaborating to the web browser.

The start-up, founded by three Ukranian entrepreneurs, uses WebGL technology (which, in short, allows web browsers to harness the power of a computer’s graphics card) to make the online tools they offer a reality. The mission? Get more people to dabble into RAW photography by offering easy access to editing tools.
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Lighting Diagram Creator Lets You Easily Save and Share Your Light Setups Online

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The Online Lighting Diagram Creator is a web app for easily creating and sharing lighting diagrams. It was created back in 2009 by Sydney-based photographer and web developer Quoc Huy Nguyen Dinh. It’s an extremely simple tool through which you can create detailed diagrams by simply clicking and dragging.
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Cameratico: A Sleek Camera Comparison Engine Based on Human Experience

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Cameratico is a new “humanized camera recommendation engine” that’s being developed by Brasília, Brazil-based photographer and programmer Fábio Pili. Sick of camera comparison websites that only dealt with specifications, Pili decided to create one that takes into account real world usage experiences.
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Focus Stacking Macro Photographs with a Hacked Flatbed Scanner

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Focus stacking is when you combine multiple photographs of different focus distances in order to obtain a single photo with a much greater depth of field than any of the individual shots. This can be done by turning the zoom ring on your lens, but this can be difficult to control (especially for highly magnified photos). It can also be done using special rigs designed for the purpose, but those are generally quite pricey.

Photographer and software engineer David Hunt recently came up with the brilliant idea of turning an old flatbed scanner into a macro rail for shooting focus-stacking photos.
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A Chrome Extension for Looking Up the Histogram of Any Online Photograph

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A couple of weeks ago we featured a Google Chrome extension for overlaying “rule of thirds” lines over any online photograph. Now we have a different tool for examining other photographer’s photographs: Image Histogram.

Created by developer/photographer Nick Burlett, it’s a Chrome Extension that can quickly bring up the histogram of any online photograph.
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This Bookmarklet Overlays Rule of Thirds Gridlines to Photos in Your Browser

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Want to see whether or not your favorite photographers are following the rule of thirds when composing their shots? Programmer and photography enthusiast Alex Dergachev has created a simple browser bookmarklet that overlays RoT gridlines over any (or almost any) web photograph.
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CrowdOptic Discovers Islands of Popular Photo Subjects in Oceans of Images

We live in a world that’s teeming with digital photographs. More photos are now uploaded every two minutes than were created during the entire 1800s. Facebook is seeing thousands of photographs uploaded to its servers every second of the day, and Instagram was flooded with 10 storm-related photos per second during Hurricane Sandy.

With such a large quantity of photographs flooding the web, it’s clear that visual data mining will be an in-demand market in the coming years as more and more people look to glean valuable images from the torrent of useless pixels. One of the companies trying to occupy this space is CrowdOptic, a San Francisco-based startup that’s building some pretty interesting location-based photo curation technologies.
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When Everyone Has Access to the Same Cameras…

Bestselling author and marketing guru Seth Godin published an interesting thought to his blog yesterday that is very relevant to aspiring photographers. He writes,

When everyone has access to the same tools then having a tool isn’t much of an advantage. The industrial age, the age of scarcity, depended in part on the advantages that came with owning tools others didn’t own.

Time for a new advantage. It might be your network, the connections that trust you. And it might be your expertise. But most of all, I’m betting it’s your attitude.

The photography industry is definitely one that has experienced (and is experiencing) a leveling of the “tools playing field”. Even more so than before, it’s what goes on in the 12 inches behind the viewfinder that sets players apart.

When everyone has access to the same tools [Seth Godin via A Photo Editor]


Image credit: PHNAT.jpg by gary_pix

How to Quickly Resize Multiple Photos in Mac OS X Using a Terminal Command

If you use a Mac and regularly need to resize batches of photos, there’s actually a tool built into your operating system that lets you do just that without having to open any image editing program. It’s called “sips”, which stands for scriptable image processing system. It’s extremely easy to use, but you’ll need to know how to use Terminal to take advantage of it.
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