Posts Tagged ‘Tips’

Get Educated: Recommended Projects and Tutorials

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As with most fields that are technology driven, in photography, if you don’t keep moving you’ll quickly find yourself dead in the water. This is why seasoned pros and amateur hobbyists alike should always be learning and expanding their abilities. It’s really the only way to stay competitive. And I don’t even mean that in a financial sense, I mean that just in terms of your skill set. Read more…

Getting the Clients You Want: Advice from Adventure Photographer Alexandre Buisse

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Commercial mountain photographer Alexandre Buisse is a natural adventurer. When it comes to rock climbing or going for his major dream client with a cold call, Alex is a brave soul with immense talent to match. His client roster includes Patagonia, Red Bull, Sports Illustrated, Outer Edge Magazine, and many more.

We talked with Alex about his experience cold emailing and calling, what he’s learned about negotiating licensing rights, and his key marketing strategies. He also lays out the three things a budding adventure photographer should do when looking to get work — including the importance of a work/fun balance. Read more…

My Tips for Photographers Attending WPPI

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Within a few short days, thousands of photographers will descend en masse upon that neon playground known as Las Vegas for WPPI’s annual conference and expo. The conference is held at the MGM Resort, or The Emerald City as I like to call it.

The MGM is located directly across the street from another resort featuring a fake skyline of New York complete with a fake Statue of Liberty. Across from that is a fake castle, down the road one way is a fake Egyptian Pyramid, and down the road the other way is a fake Eiffel Tower and volcano. Can you think of a better place for a photography convention?

Now, first time attendees of the conference can be a little overwhelmed, not just with the fakeness, but with all the things to do while at WPPI. You want to make the most of your time, and with so many options, you need a guide. So, in the interest of assuring that everyone has the best time possible, I’ve compiled my list of “Tips for Photographers Attending WPPI.” Read more…

Nat Geo Photo Editor On Listening to Your Inner Voice and Putting the Photo First

If you’ve ever dreamed of being published in National Geographic — and let’s be honest, a good number of us have fantasized about that career path — then you’re going to want to pay special attention to the short video above.

At the request of Nat Geo photographer and burn magazine editor David Alan Harvey, Nat Geo photo editor Susan Welchman gives you some concise advice on what she’s looking for from her photographers. Read more…

Very Useful Lightroom Script Can Help You Recover Lost Photos When All Else Fails

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Have you ever accidentally deleted or lost a folder full of master images in Lightroom? If you have a backup you should be okay, but even backups fail, and what then? Are you really out of luck? Are those images gone forever? Maybe not. Read more…

Have Camera, Will Travel: Fifty Awesome Photo Workshops Around the World

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You could go alone to New Zealand, Mexico, Cuba, or wherever your wanderlust takes you, and bring your camera along for the trip — hope to stumble upon the ‘photographic’ spots, and take some pictures you think might be good.

Or, you could sign up for an amazing, fully immersive photography workshop in an exotic locale with a pro photographer who knows the land, guides you to all the best spots, gives you feedback during critiques, and helps you edit your new travel portfolio along the way. We prefer the latter — and after finding out about all the amazing photography courses happening all over the world this year, we had to share. Wherever and whatever your heart desires to go and photograph, there’s probably a workshop to guide you through it. Read more…

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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How-To: Picking a Great Lens for Milky Way Photography

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The lens is the most important factor in the image quality of a landscape astrophoto.

There are a number of lens traits that will determine the quality and usability of a camera lens for astrophotography. Let me explain what sort of thinking should go into choosing and using a lens for making astrophotography and Milky Way nightscapes. Read more…

This Infographic Will Help You Remember the Ten Must-Have Wedding Shots

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Wedding photography gets a bum rap among many photographers, but the thing is, it gets that bum rap because it’s hard! You’re working in a high-stress environment, tasked with capturing someone’s ‘most important day of their lives’… and you’d better be doing it on par with the 3,426 amazing wedding photos they’ve compiled on Pinterest in preparation for this day.

With all this stress and expectations, it’s easy to miss out on a crucial snap. But have no fear, photographer Barry Page is here to help with a new infographic you’ll probably want to commit to memory this wedding season. Read more…

Video: Phenomenal ‘Know Thyself’ Advice for Photographers Courtesy of John Free

Every time we run across one of photographer John Free’s videos, we can’t help but be inspired, motivated and educated… all at the same time. The master photographer has a way of explaining fundamental concepts that we don’t often hear brought up.

In a few minutes, Free can have you picking up your camera and jetting out the door with your camera in hand and a new appreciation and understanding of your craft in mind. The video above is no exception. So sit up and listen up as Free explains the importance of getting ‘closer to yourself’ as a photographer, so that a crucial moment never slips past.

(via Reddit)

AF-ON & Back Button Autofocus: This May Just Change the Way You Shoot Forever

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Still autofocusing by pressing halfway down on your shutter release? Well, suppose I told you there’s another way that you might even like better? Sound interesting? Read on.

The technique is called Back Button Autofocus and it can really change the way you use your camera. Rather than autofocusing with your shutter release, you move the autofocus function exclusively to a button on the back of the camera. When you first hear about this technique, it’s natural to greet the idea with a bit of uncertainty, but once you get used to focusing with this method, you may never go back. Read more…