Posts Tagged ‘thoughts’

Time Travel and Ethical Photojournalism

Our goal in photojournalism is reality. The foundation of ethics in photojournalism is that our photographs of any situation should look the way our eyes saw it. Let’s use the human eye as our benchmark standard of reality. How the eye sees is our goal, and thus our reality. We forget that the human eye is not film or glass.
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Iconic Photos “Re-taken” with Instagram

I am not anti-Instgram, nor am I anti-cellphone photography. But there is a tendency to believe that the art filters that are readily available with many cellphone photo apps somehow “improve” reality. Many of the frequently used filters either significantly boost color saturation, or try to give the appearance of an antiqued, polaroid-esque photo.

But this doesn’t mean it’s better than a more true-to-life image. To prove my point, here are a few iconic photos “re-taken” with art filters a la Instagram. Do you agree?
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Moby on Photographing LA Architecture

In addition to being an internationally successful musician, Moby is also an avid photographer. He began shooting photos at the age of 10, and has since held numerous exhibitions around the world and published a photo book titled “Destroyed” (a title it shares with an album released at the same time). In the video above, Moby talks about his passion for shooting architectural photographs in Los Angeles, and also the photoblog he maintains through which he shares his work.

(via Doobybrain)

The Five ‘F’s of Street Photography

Here’s an interesting video in which street photographer John Free shares a system he’s developed to take the confusion and guesswork out of practicing street photography, called “the five Fs”. He says that contrary to popular belief, it’s not about “seeing”:

It’s not the eyes. Anybody can see that has eyes to see. It’s what we feel and what we get out of the heart that matters. We have to convey a passion. We have to convey an understanding.

The five Fs are: finding, figuring, framing, focusing, and firing.

(via DPS)

Photographers: You’re Being Replaced by Software

The image above is one-hundred percent fake. It has no connection whatsoever to the world of things. I created the bolts, lights, textures, and everything else in a free, open-source, relatively easy-to-use software package called Blender. It’s easy enough that even a novice user like me is able to make a pretty convincing image. If you are a photographer that makes a living shooting still-life photos, this should scare you.
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Garry Winogrand Interview from 1981

Here’s an interesting 1981 interview with American street photographer Garry Winogrand in which he talks about his life, his work, and — interestingly enough — how he finds the term “street photographer” stupid.

(via Phototuts+)

Why Instagram is Terrible for You, and Why You Should Use It

Although everyone has an opinion on Facebook’s purchase of Instagram for $1b, I think we can all agree: Instagram is terrible for photographers (Gotcha). Why? Let’s count the ways.
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Gear Doesn’t Matter — Except When It Does

If you follow any part of the photographic blogosphere, you’ve heard folks repeat this mantra over and over and over again: “Gear doesn’t matter.”

The basic premise of that dictum is as follows: making great pictures is about the photographer, not the camera or the lens or any other piece of gear. A good photographer can make a great image with a point-and-shoot that an amateur armed with a Nikon D4 and an 85mm f/1.4 lens can’t match.
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Stolen Moments: Matt Stuart on His Fascination with Street Photography

Here’s an interesting video in which street photographer Matt Stuart shares some of his work and talks about his love for street photography. In an interview with More Intelligent Life, Stuart states,

I’d like to be a mirror. And show people who live where I live what they’re like or what we’re doing or how we act. How we live. I think Garry Winogrand said he looks at people as animals and aren’t we bizarre? It is that standing back and trying to show us how we behave, and isn’t it funny or isn’t it sad or isn’t it ironic? I love how people act in public places.

One interesting statement he makes in the video: “the lovely thing about street photography is […] that the best stuff there’s absolutely no way you can stage, or even think of. It just like… happened, and isn’t that weird? Then it’s gone.”

(via ISO 1200)

Thoughts on What Professional Instagram Photography Will be Like

Comedian and musician Mike Falzone often records monologues on various subjects while going for walks. Here’s what he has to say about professional Instagram photography. Little does he know that one of his “farfetched” examples is very much a reality.