Posts Tagged ‘theimpossibleproject’

Hotel to Offer Polaroid Cameras and Instant Film in Guest Room Mini-bars

Next time you’re on vacation and find yourself without a camera, try checking the mini-bar in your hotel room. Ace Hotel has announced that the mini-bar in each of their guest rooms will be stock with a refurbished Polaroid camera and limited edition packs of Ace Hotel branded Impossible Project B&W instant film. If you don’t plan on staying at any of their hotels, you can also purchase the branded kits through their website for $150 each.

(via Ace Hotel via PSFK)

How “Polaroid” Instant Film is Made

Want to see how instant film for Polaroid cameras is made? How It’s Made recently paid a visit to The Impossible Project‘s factory in the Netherlands (purchased from Polaroid a few years ago) to give us a neat behind-the-scenes look at the processes that go into making the popular film.

The Revival of Instant Film: Behind the Scenes at The Impossible Project

After Polaroid stopped manufacturing instant film in 2008 — breaking the hearts of Polaroid lovers around the world — a small new company called The Impossible Project purchased Polaroid’s manufacturing equipment and factory in the Netherlands in an attempt to save the film from extinction. They were successful in doing so, announcing new lines of instant films in 2010. The above video is an interesting mini-documentary that gives us a behind-the-scenes look at what goes on at The Impossible Project.

Giant 20×24 Polaroid Photography Lives on Through NY Studio

Meet the 20×24 Polaroid Land Camera, a mythical beast in the world of large format photography. Polaroid’s founder Edwin Land created only seven of these 235-pound cameras over thirty years ago, and only six exist today. Two of them are on display at Harvard and MIT, and only four are in use commercially. According to Forbes, buying prints created with this beast cost $3,500 a piece, while renting the thing for a day costs $1,750 and $200 for each shot. Back in June, an Andy Warhol photo shot with the camera sold for a quarter of a million bucks.
Read more…

Impossible Project Not Happy with Polaroid

Polaroid stopped making instant cameras back in 2007, and ceased production of instant film two years later. Before Polaroid pulled out completely, the Dutch-based Impossible Project purchased Polaroid’s old equipment and factory in the Netherlands in an attempt to save Polaroid film from going extinct.

The company successfully re-engineered the film, and launched the new line of instant films a couple months ago. Recently they even opened up a storefront in New York City.

In the meantime, Polaroid found a new owner, and recruited Lady Gaga as the Creative Director and face of the company. Last week Polaroid announced a new instant film camera, the Polaroid 300, which looks remarkably similar to the Fujifilm Instax Mini 7.

According to Amateur Photographer, The Impossible Project isn’t very happy with the new camera, since they were expecting Polaroid to announce a new camera that would accept their 600-type film. Polaroid had showcased such a camera back at CES 2010 earlier this year.

A spokesperson for the company was quoted as saying,

The management of the Impossible Project finds this confusing and clearly wants to state that the Polaroid 300 is not the camera that has been announced in Polaroid’s press release from January 7 2010.

My guess is that we’ll be seeing Polaroid’s real announcement coming soon. If you’re a fan of Polaroid photography, hold your horses — good things come to those who wait.


On a semi-related note, Wikipedia has a pretty interesting summary of how The Impossible Project came to be:

Austrian photographer Florian Kaps, the owner of the largest online vendor for SX-70 films and organizer of the web-based instant photo gallery Polanoid.net, had bought the approximately 500,000 film packages that were on stock. He teamed with André Bosman, a former head of film production in the large Polaroid film factory at Enschede, designed a plan to redesign the SX-70/600 film system in collaboration with Ilford Photo, and convinced the Polaroid owners to participate. Plans for a relaunch under the Impossible label were announced in January 2009. Buildings in the Enschede plant, which had produced 30 million film packs in 2007 and 24 million in the first half of 2008, were leased to the company created by Kaps, who by May 2009 had raised $2.6 million from friends and family for what he had named The Impossible Project.

500,000 film packages? Wow…

Impossible Project Sets Up Shop in NYC

In March, The Impossible Project announced that it had successfully brought Polaroid film back from the dead, releasing the new PX100 and PX600 instant films. Next up: a physical store in New York City.

The Impossible Project has just announced a new retail and exhibition space in New York City called “The Impossible Project Space”, located on the 5th floor at 425 Broadway. In addition to selling film and gear, the space will display works from “The Impossible Collection”, which is modeled after the world-famous Polaroid Collection and features work created on Impossible Project film.

There’s going be a grand opening party from 3pm-8pm on April 30th, so if you’re a Polaroid lover, it might be a fantastic way to connect with other enthusiasts.

(via PDNPulse)


Image credit: Photograph by The Impossible Project

Polaroid Film Returns from the Dead

Time to dust off your old Polaroid cameras. The Impossible Project has just unveiled its new PX100 and PX600 instant films for Polaroid cameras, after a three year effort to save Polaroid photography from extinction. The $21 packs, available starting Thursday, will each provide 8 black and white images. Color film packs are also expected to be released sometime this summer.

PX100 film is for the SX-70 Polaroid camera from the 1970′s, while PX600 is for more recent cameras that take 600-series film. While the new film will not carry Polaroid branding, new Polaroid instant film cameras that use the film have been announced. The company plans to produce more than 1 million packs in the first year.

Do you love Polaroid enough to pick it up again for $2-3 a shot?

The Impossible Project May Not Be Possible After All

After Polaroid announced that it would stop producing instant film in 2008, a group called The Impossible Project acquired the last instant film production facility in the Netherlands in a bid to save the beloved medium. This past weekend, the group ran into “an unexpected problem with one of the components vital for production,” possibly jeopardizing the project.

The group was scheduled to hold an event on February 22nd in New York, where the original instant film was announced 63 years ago, but that has been postponed. In their press release, they state,

On 22nd MARCH 2010 [the project leaders] will disclose whether or not their Impossible Project will be possible.

On behalf of all the Polaroid-enthusiasts who read PetaPixel, we wish The Impossible Project Godspeed!

(via Amateur Photographer)


Update:

Hmmm… The group (@ImpossibleUSA) has tweeted a response to this post, stating that the problem was simply a shipment issue by one of the suppliers. However, if you read the press release on their website, it sounds much more dire than the situation apparently is.