Posts Tagged ‘theimpossibleproject’

‘Consistent Quality Photographic Film Will Be Impossible to Make’

The Economist has published an article on photographic film’s “transition from the mass market to the artisanal,” writing that the future is bleak for film as we know it:

Consumers and professionals ditched film first. Then health-care services, which used it for X-rays, shifted to digital scans. The final blow came with the film industry’s switch to digital projection. IHS iSuppli [...] estimates filmmakers consumed 2.5m miles [...] of film each year for the distribution of prints at its height. That was just a few years ago. By 2012 this plunged by two-thirds. In 2015 it will be next to nothing.

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Polaroid Jacket Lets You Wear What the Company’s Factory Workers Wore

After Polaroid film died off, the The Impossible Project spent years rebooting the factories and breathing new life into old lines of instant film. However, the white-bordered film isn’t the only thing Impossible has brought back from the dead. The company has also recreated Polaroid fashion from decades ago, launching the Polaroid Classic Factory Jacket.
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The Impossible Project VP Talks About Resurrecting the Polaroid Instamatic

ReutersTV shared this video today in which its Social Media Editor Anthony De Rosa meets up with The Impossible Project VP Dave Bias to talk about the company and what it’s up to. Bias gives a demo of the new Impossible Instant Lab — similar to what we shared from Photokina — showing how it takes iPhone pixels and “melts them back down into chemistry”.
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Watch the Impossible Instant Lab Turn an iPhone Portrait into a Polaroid Picture

At The Impossible Project’s booth at Photokina 2012, there was a Impossible Instant Lab camera printer/camera being demonstrated. This is the device that was announced a couple of weeks ago that lets you quickly turn your iPhone photos into Polaroid pictures (i.e. Impossible’s instant film or whatever stock you have left).
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Shooting with the First Lot of Impossible’s New 8×10 Large Format Instant Film

San Diego-based photographer Tim Mantoani, the guy who shot giant Polaroid photos of famous photographers holding their works, recently got his hands on Lot #1 of The Impossible Project’s new 8×10 instant film. To test it out, Mantoani busted out his large format camera and 8×10 processor, and then visited a local surf shop to create a multi-shot panorama.
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The Impossible Project Has Revived 8×10 Large Format Instant Film

Guess who’s back? Back again. 8×10 instant film’s back. Tell a friend.

After successfully reviving various lines of instant film for Polaroid cameras, The Impossible Project announced today that they’ve created a new line of 8×10 instant film for large format cameras.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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The Impossible Project’s COOL Instant Film Takes a Cue from Coors Beer

You wouldn’t think the world of instant film could learn much from the world of beer — and on most counts you’d be right — but in this particular case, a little bit of Coors inspiration may have played a role in The Impossible Projects new line of COOL Polaroid films. The specialty instant film, part of The Impossible Project’s Spring 2012 line, are kept in a temperature-sensitive package. In order to maintain its shelf life, the packaging will warn you when you’re storing it in too warm an environment by displaying the message “Keep Me Cool.”
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Upcoming Documentary About the Death and Rebirth of Polaroid Pictures

Time Zero: The Last Year of Polaroid Film is an upcoming documentary about the death of Polaroid and the subsequent rise of “The Impossible Project”:

In February 2008, Polaroid announced that it was ceasing production of instant film. ‘TIME ZERO’ is a documentary that tells the story of the last year of Polaroid film in three acts. Act I introduces the magic of Polaroid through the perspective of Polaroid artists and former employees of the corporation. Act II begins with the discontinuation of instant film and covers the grass-roots movement to keep it alive. Act III centers on ‘The Impossible Project’ and follows their against-the-odds effort to reinvent instant film.

The film was created by Polaroid enthusiast Grant Hamilton, and will premier on April 28 at the Independent Film Festival in Somerville, MA — three miles away from Polaroid’s former headquarters.

Time Zero(via PopPhoto)

Nigo: Limited Edition Instant Film with Colorful Frames

The Impossible Project has partnered up with Japanese music producer and designer Nigo for a limited edition version of its PX 70 Color Shade Film. Instead of its traditional white frames or the newer black frames, the film comes in 10 different colors: yellow, orange, red, pink, lilac, dark blue, light blue, green, black and white. Each pack comes with eight frames with randomly selected colors and costs $25 over at The Impossible Project shop.

PX 70 Color Shade by Nigo Film Edition [Impossible Project]

Polaroid and The Impossible Project Team Up, Release Paper Camera Kit

The Impossible Project and Polaroid have teamed up to launch the Polaroid Classic line. Every year the two companies will be collaborating on 6-10 Polaroid Classic branded products. Guess what the first product is? A DIY paper camera kit!

Build your own Polaroid camera classics! This Do It Yourself craft set makes you the proud owner of six legendary, analog instant camera replicas (see the Specs tab for the included camera models). The paper models of classic Polaroid cameras are fun to create and perfect in every detail, including mini faux Polaroid photos that develop when rubbed.

Tiny Polaroid pictures that develop when you rub them? That’s certainly fancier than Matthew Nicholson’s papercraft Polaroid camera (on the other hand, Nicholson’s can take actual pinhole photos).

Polaroid Classic (via Photojojo)


P.S. They’re also teaming up to sell off the last batch of Polaroid film ever produced.