Posts Tagged ‘technology’

New ‘Nano-Camera’ from MIT Sees Things at the Speed of Light, Costs Only $500

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A super-fast, affordable new camera currently under development at MIT could improve everything from video game experiences to driving safety, researchers reported at a recent tech convention. Read more…

Will Future Camera Image Sensors be Made from Bacteria?

A working "Gibson assembly" of photosensitive bacteria.

Students at a British university may have hit upon the basis for the next generation of image sensors — a living module based on bio-engineered, light-sensitive bacteria. Read more…

Researchers Develop Method for Getting High-Quality Photos from Crappy Lenses

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There are many reason high-quality lenses cost as much as they do (and in some cases that is quite a lot), and one of them is that high-end lenses use many specially-designed elements that are perfectly-positioned to counteract aberrations and distortions.

But what if you could correct for all of that in post? Automatically? With just the click of a button? You could theoretically use a crappy lens and generate high-end results. Well, that’s what researchers at the University of British Columbia are working on, and so far their results are very promising. Read more…

New Camera Tech Combines Ultra-Wide View with Fine Detail Capture

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Researchers at the University of California-San Diego are fine-tuning some new tiny camera technology that could dramatically boost the detail and field of view of smartphone cameras. Joseph Ford, a professor in the university’s Jacob School of Engineering, describes the system in a paper to be presented next week at the Optical Society of America‘s annual meeting.

According to Ford, his team will soon have the system — seen above next to a Canon 5D Mark III setup — refined to a camera assembly with 85-megapixel resolution, 120-degree field of view and f/2 aperture, all in a package about the size of a walnut. Read more…

Photogs Probably Won’t be Replaced by Robots Anytime Soon, Study Finds

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There are many reasons why “photographer” and “photojournalist” ranked so low on last year’s “best and worst jobs” list, but according to a paper released by The Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology at Oxford University, the threat of computerization isn’t one of them. Read more…

High-Speed Camera System Can Capture Objects Traveling at 7,500 MPH

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Researchers at a California company specializing in high-speed imaging equipment have developed a camera add-on capable of freezing objects traveling at up to 7,500 miles per hour — that’s almost 10 times the speed of sound. Read more…

This Crazy Rig of 60 DSLRs Can Turn You Into a 3D Selfie Sculpture

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Got a few dozen spare DSLRs and fistful of startup capital? Then you, too, could get into the emerging field of 3D selfies, as pioneered by Texas photo studio Captured Dimensions.

Photographer Jordan Williams started the business a few years ago after becoming convinced there was more to 3D printing than making industrial prototypes and the like. He fashioned a 360-degree photo studio in the Dallas suburb of Richardson, outfitted with more than 60 DSLRs, all remoted-out for simultaneous shutter release.
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Hack Transforms Common Microscopes Into Gigapixel Superscopes

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Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have come up with an inexpensive way to boost the resolution of common microscopes by a factor of 100, allowing medical clinics in developing countries to conduct complex tests with existing equipment.
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New Tech Could One Day Beam Invisible Ads Directly Into Your Camera

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Just in case you weren’t feeling media-saturated enough already: there’s word of an emerging technology that could decorate your photos with ads only a camera can see.
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Researchers Reconstruct Highly-Accurate 3D Scenes Using High-Res Photos

3D modeling for movies and video games is often done using lasers. The modeler scans whatever it is they are trying to reconstruct using a laser and then ends up spending a good bit of time cleaning up the results in post. In contrast, a new method developed by the folks at Disney Zurich promises to generate much more accurate results by replacing the lasers with photos. Read more…