Posts Tagged ‘technique’

Creative Idea: Walking Forward in a Backward World

Here’s a fun and creative idea that requires brains rather than a big budget: using an ordinary video-capable camera and some basic editing software, you can show a person walking forward through a world that’s traveling backward. For even crazier examples of this same technique, check out the music videos for The Scientist by Coldplay, Typical by Mutemath, and Drop by The Pharcyde.

(via Reddit)

Famous Places Photographed in Bubbles

While on vacation in Ireland five years ago and browsing a street fair, photographer Tom Storm captured a few shots of bubbles floating past. After reviewing the photos and discovering that a whole world was captured in the bubbles, he began to intentionally photograph bubbles while visiting landmarks around the world.
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How to Create Artificial Sunlight on an Overcast Day Using a “Dingle”

In this video, UK photography instructor Damien Lovegrove demonstrates how you can add some pseudo-sunlight to portraits by simply placing some weeds or part of a bush — which he calls a “dingle” — between an off-camera flash and your subject.

(via Fstoppers)

Stepping Into Historical Photos with 3D Camera Mapping

Miklós Falvay used 3D camera mapping techniques on some historical photographs, turning them into tiny windows into the past that viewers can step into.

(via curiosity counts via Laughing Squid)

Throw Your Camera into the Air for a Group Photo from Above

You’ve probably heard of tossing your camera into the air for abstract light painting photos, but what about for actual photos? Wedding photographer Mike Larson shoots group photos from above — with himself in the shot — by throwing a DSLR and fisheye lens into the air and letting the timer trigger the shutter. You can find some examples of photos made using this technique over on Larson’s website.

If you do try your hand at camera toss photos, make sure you have awesome hand-eye coordination and that you’re standing on soft ground (e.g. grass, cotton balls, marshmallows).

Mike Larson: Camera Toss (via Fstoppers)

Photographer Makes “Chlorophyll Prints” Using Leaves and Sunlight

Photographer Binh Danh observed one summer that there was a difference in color between grass under a water hose and the grass directly exposed to sunlight. He then began to experiment with combining photography with photosynthesis, and came up with what he calls “chlorophyll prints” — photographs printed onto leaves using the sun.
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Gloomy Crowds Captured as Shadows After Soviet Union Collapse

After the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, photographer Alexey Titarenko observed how St. Petersburg streets that used to be lively and filled with joyful people had suddenly turned dark and gloomy, with people confused, malnourished, and worn out. He decided to capture this change by shooting the streets at slow shutter speeds, turning the downtrodden crowds into shadowy figures. He titled the resulting project “City of Shadows“.
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How to Photograph Yourself Levitating

Hayashi Natsumi’s levitation photos have received a lot of publicity as of late (check out her blog here), prompting Kai over at DigitalRev to create this short video tutorial teaching the technique. Could be a fun weekend project if you’re looking for something to shoot.

(via Colossal)

Can You Figure Out the Secret Technique Used in this Timelapse?

Ordinarily if there’s movement in a timelapse video, it’s constrained to a small area because a dolly or crane system was used to change the position of the camera small distances between shots. The folks at T-RECS came up with a special way to introduce large distance movements into timelapse shots, but are keeping mum on how they did it. Check out the showreel above and see if you can figure out their secret technique.

(via Fstoppers)

360-Degree Panoramic Time-Lapses Shot with One Camera

Ken Murphy created this time-lapse showing an entire 360-degree view overlooking San Francisco using only a single camera:

The camera (a Canon A590 with CHDK installed) snapped an image every five seconds while the motorized mount slowly rotated, making a single rotation in 90 minutes. I assembled the images into this panoramic movie, in which each “pane” is actually the same movie, slightly offset in time. The panes combine to make a single 360-degree view. [#]

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