Posts Tagged ‘technique’

Painting with Light: Lighting and Layering a B-25 Bomber

Here’s an illuminating (pun intended) video walkthrough by photographer Eric Curry, showing how he went about creating a photo of a B-25 bomber. His technique for lighting the plane is similar to the real estate photography walkthrough that we featured last weekend, and involves lighting the scene a bazillion times from different angles, and then combining the different parts of the photo in Photoshop.

As he says in the video, it’s a useful technique that can be done by “anyone with a digital camera and a tremendous amount of patience.”

(via fotografia)

Print Your Photos Using an Old 1800s Salt Printing Technique

If printing your film photos with the usual chemicals isn’t old school enough for your taste, you should try your hand at making a salt print. Photographer Andrew B. Myers made the above print using the technique, and explains,

Salt printing is one of the oldest processes photography has employed, pioneered by Henry Fox Talbot back in 1839. The process hasn’t changed much since then. Basically, you start by coating paper in a solution of water and sodium chloride (I ended up using table salt) and letting it dry. Next, in a darkroom environment, a silver nitrate solution is applied to the salted paper, creating a light sensitive emulsion. Let it dry. At this point, a contact print can be made by sandwiching a film negative or some sort of transparency and letting the paper sit in the sun. In my case, I had access to a powerful UV light with a timer, which worked in a similar fashion, and allowed me to work at night in the winter. It’s quite neat seeing the image once it’s been exposed, and after washing and fixing, you’re done. [#]

You can find a more in-depth tutorial over at Dulce Photography, or browse some more sample salt prints in this Flickr group.

(via Photojojo)


Image credit: Photograph by Andrew B. Myers and used with permission

Creative Idea: Walking Forward in a Backward World

Here’s a fun and creative idea that requires brains rather than a big budget: using an ordinary video-capable camera and some basic editing software, you can show a person walking forward through a world that’s traveling backward. For even crazier examples of this same technique, check out the music videos for The Scientist by Coldplay, Typical by Mutemath, and Drop by The Pharcyde.

(via Reddit)

Famous Places Photographed in Bubbles

While on vacation in Ireland five years ago and browsing a street fair, photographer Tom Storm captured a few shots of bubbles floating past. After reviewing the photos and discovering that a whole world was captured in the bubbles, he began to intentionally photograph bubbles while visiting landmarks around the world.
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How to Create Artificial Sunlight on an Overcast Day Using a “Dingle”

In this video, UK photography instructor Damien Lovegrove demonstrates how you can add some pseudo-sunlight to portraits by simply placing some weeds or part of a bush — which he calls a “dingle” — between an off-camera flash and your subject.

(via Fstoppers)

Stepping Into Historical Photos with 3D Camera Mapping

Miklós Falvay used 3D camera mapping techniques on some historical photographs, turning them into tiny windows into the past that viewers can step into.

(via curiosity counts via Laughing Squid)

Throw Your Camera into the Air for a Group Photo from Above

You’ve probably heard of tossing your camera into the air for abstract light painting photos, but what about for actual photos? Wedding photographer Mike Larson shoots group photos from above — with himself in the shot — by throwing a DSLR and fisheye lens into the air and letting the timer trigger the shutter. You can find some examples of photos made using this technique over on Larson’s website.

If you do try your hand at camera toss photos, make sure you have awesome hand-eye coordination and that you’re standing on soft ground (e.g. grass, cotton balls, marshmallows).

Mike Larson: Camera Toss (via Fstoppers)

Photographer Makes “Chlorophyll Prints” Using Leaves and Sunlight

Photographer Binh Danh observed one summer that there was a difference in color between grass under a water hose and the grass directly exposed to sunlight. He then began to experiment with combining photography with photosynthesis, and came up with what he calls “chlorophyll prints” — photographs printed onto leaves using the sun.
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Gloomy Crowds Captured as Shadows After Soviet Union Collapse

After the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, photographer Alexey Titarenko observed how St. Petersburg streets that used to be lively and filled with joyful people had suddenly turned dark and gloomy, with people confused, malnourished, and worn out. He decided to capture this change by shooting the streets at slow shutter speeds, turning the downtrodden crowds into shadowy figures. He titled the resulting project “City of Shadows“.
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How to Photograph Yourself Levitating

Hayashi Natsumi’s levitation photos have received a lot of publicity as of late (check out her blog here), prompting Kai over at DigitalRev to create this short video tutorial teaching the technique. Could be a fun weekend project if you’re looking for something to shoot.

(via Colossal)