Posts Tagged ‘technique’

How to Shoot Starry Photos of Fireflies

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Firefly photographs are commonly shot using long exposures from a tripod. The proper exposure depends on the ratio of the fireflies’ luminosity to that of the background. That ratio is constant if we assume (as is usually the case) that the background lighting doesn’t change much over the course of a session. We usually would like a rather long exposure because we want to see lots of fireflies in the final image.

The problem is that fireflies flash briefly, whereas the background illumination persists for the duration of the exposure. Over the course of a long exposure the background brightness builds up to the the point where it’s as bright as the fireflies, and the image looks terrible.
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Quick and Easy Trick For Adding a Black Background to Your Shots Anywhere

Photographer Glyn Dewis shared this cool little technique that lets you work with a black background even if you don’t have an actual backdrop with you. It’s a fairly common trick that he refers to as “the invisible black background,” and it’s a nifty little tip that many photographers may want to keep up their sleeve. Read more…

A Look at Reducing Noise in Photographs Using Median Blending

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Between a recent post here on PetaPixel about the Beauty of Space Photography, and my own experiments on blending series of images using averaging techniques, I noticed some rather interesting alignments in technique.
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My One-Shot, Zero-Setup, Sure-Fire Guide to Photographing Wedding Cakes

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This guide is what I do during wedding days, and I typically photograph the cake right when I enter the reception location. Overall, I take 4 shots of the cake: 1 vertical, 1 horizontal, 1 detail of topper, and 1 detail of the base or whatever is the most interesting on the cake.

This process takes me literally 30 seconds. That’s it; done. Move on to centerpieces. This guide is for photographing real cakes on real wedding days for wedding photography professionals.
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A Complete Guide to Star Trailing

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Ever see those pictures where the stars streak across the sky in a big arc? Or maybe the whole sky looked like it was spinning? What you saw was star trails. The streaks were light left behind on the sensor or film from the star as it traveled across the sky in front of an open camera shutter. In fact, what are being recorded are stationary stars and the rotation of the earth as it spins past them. For me, the images seem to have a certain magic or mystery about them.

You must have heard a photographer talking about capturing that perfect moment in time. Well for capturing star trails you will need to capture the perfect hour or two in time. For such amazing looking images, the technique used to capture them is really quite simple. Keep reading for a complete set of instructions from start to finish.
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Cinemagraph-style Music Video Blends Motion and Still Photography

Directors Ian & Cooper created this clever music video for the song “Back to Me” by Joel Compass using cinemagraph-style shots. Each scene is a strange fusion of motion picture and still photography, as some areas look like a photograph, while other portions look like video footage. If you’re not familiar with the term “cinemagraph,” check out other examples of the technique we’ve featured in the past.

(via John Nack)

Stop Motion Musical Tours Through a City and a School

Photographer and director Greg Jardin made this creative music video for the song “New York City” by Joey Ramone. It’s a stop-motion video that features 115 people (some of them random pedestrians yanked off the street) traveling backwards through various locations in New York City.
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Freelensing: Make a DIY “Poor Man’s Tilt-Shift” by Breaking a Cheap Prime Lens

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Freelensing. It’s been around for a while. It’s essentially the “poor man’s tilt shift.” All the technique requires is disconnecting a lens from the camera body and floating it around in front of your sensor to shift the focal plane in weird directions. It takes practice to get accurate with it, but overall the technique is pretty straightforward.

I wanted to take it a bit further.
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Project Uses a “Bullet Time” Camera Rig for 360-Degree Light Painting Portraits

For their project 24×360, Patrick Rochon, Timecode Lab, and Eric Paré combined a 360-degree “bullet time” rig with light painting and produced some pretty sweet results. The short teaser above shows some of the pieces they created.
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Joel Meyerowitz Says He Despises Bruce Gilden’s Attitude, Calls Him a Bully

Sean O’Hagan over at The Observer has published an interesting profile of famed NYC street photographer Joel Meyerowitz, who had some pretty harsh things to say about his fellow NYC street shooter, Bruce Gilden:

I ask Meyerowitz about the combative, confrontational style of street photography espoused by the likes of fellow New Yorker Bruce Gilden, and he grows visibly angry for the only time in our conversation. “He’s a f**king bully. I despise the work, I despise the attitude, he’s an aggressive bully and all the pictures look alike because he only has one idea – ‘I’m gonna embarrass you, I’m going to humiliate you.’ I’m sorry, but no.”

Meyerowitz says that his street photography style is based on his boxer father’s advice to “pay attention” and anticipate the actions of the people he photographed. So here’s the difference between these two famous street photographers: one anticipates, and the other instigates.

Joel Meyerowitz: ‘brilliant mistakes … amazing accidents’ [The Observer]


P.S. Last month we wrote on how Gilden’s street photography attitude carries over into his teaching persona as well.


Thanks for sending in the tip, Phil!


Image credit: Joel Meyerowitz portrait 11/03/2012 reception by Jill Gewirtz