Posts Tagged ‘technical’

MTF Charts: The English Translation

mtfchart

This post contains absolutely no mathematics. Explaining MTF without math is sort of like doing a high-wire act without a net. It’s dangerous, but for any number of reasons is more likely to keep the audience interested.
Read more…

A Bit of A7R Sanity: Rising Above the Trash Talk and Fanboy-ism with Actual Facts

a7r_1

A while back I wrote a post I humbly called Roger’s Law of New Product Introduction, complete with the graph shown below. The release of the Sony A7R has demonstrated the accuracy of that post as few other releases have. Read more…

What a DSLR’s CMOS Sensor Looks Like Under a Microscope

cmosmicrograph-1

Jack over at the astrophotography blog The Landingfield has published a series of photographs showing what a digital camera’s CMOS sensor looks like when viewed through a microscope. The sensor (seen above) was taken from a broken Nikon D2H — a DSLR from back in the early 2000s.
Read more…

Advanced Image Sensor Concepts Explained with Beer

When German image sensor scientist Joachim Linkemann gave a talk called “Advanced Camera and Image Sensor Technology” at Automate 2011 back in March 2011, he tried to boil things down to terms people could understand and ended up using beer to illustrate the concepts. If you want to learn about how things like signal-to-noise, dynamic range, and dark noise would work if a glass of beer was the pixel on an image sensor, check out the PDF slideshow.

Advanced Camera and Image Sensor Technology (via Image Sensors World via Rob Galbraith)

A Simple Explanation of F-Stop Numbers

Even if you have a good command of using f-stop numbers and properly exposing photographs, you might not understand the math behind why f-stop numbers are what they are. Here’s a simple (albeit math-filled) explanation by Dylan Bennett of what f-stop is, including a simple trick you can use to memorize the f-stop scale.

Flash Applets on Some Technical Aspects of Photography

The digital photography course offered by Stanford (CS 178, which we featured last year) has an awesome page filled with flash applets that can help you gain a better understanding of certain technical aspects of photography. These include understanding how various factors affect depth of field, a visual look at how phase detection autofocus works, and a simple introduction to color theory.

Flash applets on some technical aspects of photography [Stanford]

A Simple Lesson on Depth of Field

Here’s a simple lesson by Dylan Bennett on what depth of field is, how it works, and how to control it in your photography.

A Simple Explanation of How ISO Works in Digital Photography

If you’re a fan of learning things through Khan Academy, then you might enjoy learning about how ISO works in this similar-styled tutorial by Dylan Bennett. Bennett might not have Salman Khan’s soothing voice, but he does his best to break down the magic of digital camera sensors into easy to understand ideas. For a more detailed and comprehensive understanding of how things work, check out Cambridge in Colour’s excellent tutorials.

A Lesson on How Shutter Sync Works

Here’s an informative lesson on shutter sync by photographer Matthew Gore, who writes,

I made this video to provide a quick explanation of how focal-plane shutters work on SLR cameras, and why it’s important when using a flash.

We shared a similar tutorial back in February.

(via ISO 1200)

Nikon 1 Mirrorless Cameras Crunch Data 5x Faster Than the D3X

Nikon included the above illustration when announcing its new mirrorless cameras in the UK. The company’s new EXPEED 3 image processor, which is supposedly “the fastest in the world”, can process data at a whopping 600 megapixels per second. That’s equivalent to 24 frames per second with a 25MP sensor!

In an interview with The Imagine Resource, Nikon General Manager Masahiro Suzuki says that the processor is five times faster than the company’s current flagship DSLRs by using 24 channels of digital readout instead of 12 channels of analog readout. Regardless of whether or not the Nikon 1 System succeeds, the fact that this kind of technology is making its way into consumer cameras is pretty exciting.

(via dpreview)