Posts Tagged ‘surreal’

Levitation Project: Pictures of People Lying Down in Midair

Photographer David Nemcsik of Budapest, Hungary has a beautiful project titled the “Levitation Project” that features surreal images of people floating in midair in a lying up down position. The subjects are Nemcsik’s friends, and the locations were picked by asking them this simple question: “where were you in your last dream?”.
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How to Create a Surreal Double Exposure Portrait Using Photoshop

Here’s a tutorial by photographer Stephen Davies on how you can create a pseudo double exposure photograph using a couple simple steps in Photoshop.
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Incredible Long Exposure Photographs Shot from Orbit

Last month we shared a long exposure photograph by NASA astronaut Don Pettit that showed star trails and city trails in the same frame. Turns out the photo was just one of many long exposure images shot by Pettit so far during Expedition 31. The photograph above shows star trails, an aurora, and flashes of lightning splattered all across the surface of the Earth.
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Flying Houses Floating in the Sky

For his project Flying Houses, photographer Laurent Chehere photographed various buildings and then Photoshopped them to transform them into surreal UP-style floating houses.
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Surreal Locations Created by Mirroring Landscape Photos

For his project titled Perspe, Italian photographer Gustav Willeit created imaginary locations by mirroring landscape photographs and then adding in non-symmetrical elements into the images.
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Surreal Portraits Created by Painting Developer Onto Photo Paper

At first glance, photographer Timothy Pakron’s “Silver Print” series of portraits might look like ink paintings or some kind of CG art. They’re actually photographs created by hand painting developer onto photo paper in the darkroom instead of immersing the paper entirely in the solution. Pakron writes,

By using the familiarity of the face as the template, my process involves hand painting the developer in the darkroom, intentionally revealing specific, desired aspects of the face in the negative. Doing so creates a stark negative space that gives the portrait a lucidity. Instead of creating a realistic, straight from film portrait, I am more interested in exploring how the original image can be brought to the surface in alternative ways. The portraits embody their own unique strangeness.

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Metamorphose: Surreal Slit Scan Photos of a Human Body in Nature

Metamorphose is a project by photographer Frederic Fontenoy that consists of slit-scan self portraits created in outdoor locations. The technique produces an effect that makes his body look like it’s metamorphosing into some other life form.
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Surreal 360-Degree Panoramas Created by Stitching Hundreds of Photos

Photographer Randy Scott Slavin creates spherical panoramic photographs of various cityscapes and landscapes. He makes the surreal images by shooting hundreds of photographs of a scene and then stitching them together into a stereographic projection. He calls the work Alternate Perspectives. Slavin writes,

The photographing of the images is the actually least time consuming part of the process. What takes the longest is finding the places that are worthy of shooting and getting to the spot that’s best to shoot them from. You can’t light landscapes so it’s important to figure out what the best time of day is to take a photograph. Sometimes this means long hours of waiting and watching.

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Eye-Popping Dance Video Created with a Giant 59-Foot-Tall Kaleidoscope

What do you get when you cross a camera, dancers, and a gigantic 59-foot-tall kaleidoscope? “The Power of X”. This amazing dance video was created for TEDxSummit conference that was recently held in Qatar, and was created without any computer trickery. Everything you see in the video is what the camera captured through the kaleidoscope on a massive soundstage. To see how it was created, check out the behind-the-scenes video.

(via Laughing Squid)

Tape Transfer Portraits Show Subjects Behind Their Own Altered Photos

Photographer Rory White‘s Rorshak Tape Transfer Series might look like some kind of surreal digital art, but the images were actually created without Photoshop. White shot portraits of his subjects, printed them out, and invited the subjects to paint, tear, and alter the prints. He then covered the image with packing tape, dropped it in hot water, and peeled off the paper on the back (like a Polaroid emulsion transfer). The semi-transparent image would then be hung from a stand, and the subject rephotographed while standing behind it.
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