Posts Tagged ‘superslowmo’

What a Camera Flash Looks Like in Super Slow Motion

sonyflashslow

Photographer Florian Knorn recently took a Fastcam SA4 high speed camera — ordinarily used for observing things like ballistics and fluid dynamics — and pointed it at a Sony HVL-F58AM flash unit, capturing what a camera flash firing looks like when captured at 500,000 frames per second and then slowed down to to 25fps.
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What 10FPS on a Nikon D4 Looks Like in 1920FPS Super Slow Motion

It’s not uncommon for digital cameras to have burst modes as fast as 10 frames per second these days — especially in mirrorless and pellicle mirror cameras — but do you think you have a good understanding of just how fast 10FPS is? If not, check out this video by YouTube user krnabrnydziobak, who pointed a Phantom Miro eX2 at a Nikon D4 to see what 10FPS looks like when captured at a staggering 1920FPS.
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Beautiful Slow-Mo Using $300K Worth of Camera Gear on a Hot Summer Day

What would you capture if you had a day off on a hot summer day with $300,000 worth of camera gear lying around the house? That was the happy situation filmmaker Brad Kremer found himself in recently. The gear he found himself with at the time included an uber-expensive Phantom Flex high-speed camera, Zeiss super speed glass, a Canon 5D Mark III DSLR, and Canon L glass. He decided to put the gear to use (and flex his creative muscles) by inviting the neighborhood children over for a water balloon party — the perfect recipe for epic slow-motion footage.

As summer comes to an end and Autumn begins, kids go back to school and dream of warm days filled with laughter and joy. This short film is a reflection of that dream. Shot with a Phantom Flex it captures the magic of the moment. With frame rates of up to 2564 fps at 1080p we see every detail, every smile and every sparkle in the kids eyes. And that is where the magic lies. Within the hopes and dreams of our children.

He titled the resulting short film (shown above) A Phantom Flex Summer Story. It does not disappoint.

(via John Nack)


P.S. In case you’re wondering, the song in the background is “Moonchild” by the band M83.

Awe-Inspiring Footage of Fire Breathing Captured at 2000FPS

It seems like everything is cooler in super slow motion, and fire-breathing is certainly no exception. Vancouver-based still photographer and filmmaker Chris Bolton used a Weisscam HS-2 to capture people breathing fireballs at 2,000 frames per second.

(via Fstoppers)

Jaw-Dropping Slow Motion Footage of Lightning Shot at 7,207 FPS

Photographer Tom Warner shot this slow motion incredible video of lightning at 7,207 frames per second. APOD writes,

The above lightning bolt starts with many simultaneously creating ionized channels branching out from an negatively charged pool of electrons and ions that has somehow been created by drafts and collisions in a rain cloud. About 0.015 seconds after appearing — which takes about 3 seconds in the above time-lapse video — one of the meandering charge leaders makes contact with a suddenly appearing positive spike moving up from the ground and an ionized channel of air is created that instantly acts like a wire. Immediately afterwards, this hot channel pulses with a tremendous amount of charges shooting back and forth between the cloud and the ground, creating a dangerous explosion that is later heard as thunder. Much remains unknown about lightning, however, including details of the mechanism that separates charges.

It’s amazing how much action goes on in just a blink of the eye.

Single Stroke CG in High Speed (via APOD)


Video credits: Footage by Tom A. Warner/ZTResearch/WeatherVideoHD.TV and used with permission

Super Slow Motion Bullet Footage Using a Car As the Projectile

You know those amazing high speed photos and videos of bullets being shot through various objects? BMW Canada decided to take things a step further and use a car instead of a bullet. They drove a car at top speed across salt flats and had it smash through a giant glass apple, some giant water balloons, and a target. The resulting slow motion footage is quite amazing.

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Stupid Things in Super Slow Motion

There’s a Danish TV show called “Dumt & Farligt” in which two guys are given a house and the task of doing stupid and dangerous things that come to mind. In addition to recording the experiments in real time, the show decided to also use a Phantom Flex high speed camera to capturing everything at 2,500 frames per second. The video above provides a slow motion look at things ranging from setting off large fireworks indoors to microwaving a bottle of red wine.

(via kottke.org)

The Stunning Colors of the Holi Festival in India Captured at 2,500FPS

New York-based production company Variable traveled to India and pointed a Phantom Flex high speed camera at the Holi festival celebrations.

The world is fascinating. People and cultures inspire us. Sadly, the fast paced lifestyles of our generation result in many not taking the necessary step back to soak in the existing world around us. Our goal with this film is to help viewers further appreciate and take notice of the beauty in life & culture that lies within our world…

…so the next time you notice something that strikes you as interesting, stop for a second, start powering on your camera, think about why it’s unique, and snap the shot before you miss it. Life is extraordinary. Embrace it. [#]

The colorful powders thrown around are stunning when captured at 2,500 frames per second.

The Beauty of Ballet Captured at 1000FPS

Here’s a stunning super slow motion video that shows Marina Kanno and Giacomo Bevilaqua of Staatsballett Berlin performing several jumps. The footage was captured at 1000 frames per second.

Giant Waves Captured in Super Slow-Mo

Cinematographer Chris Bryan used a Phantom HD Gold camera in a custom underwater housing to capture super slow-motion footage of waves in Sydney, Australia. Water looks amazing at thousands of frames per second. Be sure to watch it full screen and in high-def.

(via PhotoWeeklyOnline)