Posts Tagged ‘sunset’

Malicious Malware Uses Photos of Sunsets and Cats to Steal Banking Credentials

zeus-sunset

It’s a sad day for the Internet… according to Trend Micro’s security analysts, it’s been discovered that photographs of both sunsets and — even more heartbreaking — cats being shared across the web contain malware capable of getting into your bank accounts. Read more…

7 Colorful Hours of a Sunset Captured in a Single Photograph

Turkey-based photography enthusiast Isil Karanfil created this beautiful image showing an entire sunset in a single photograph. Karanfil fixed her Nikon D60 in its view of the seascape, and then shot a single photograph every hour for seven hours between 3pm and 9pm as the day turned into night. She then took the resulting photographs, sliced them up, and combined them together using Photoshop for the image seen above, which she titles, “Sun Lapse”.
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Seagull Steals Camera, Films Itself Flying Off Into the Sunset

Be careful not to leave your camera unattended when animals are nearby — you never know what might happen. We’ve shared a number of videos in the past of animals such as monkeys, octopi, sharks, and seagulls “borrowing” cameras for their own purposes.

French tourist Nathalie Rollandin came across a camera-happy seagull recently. She was visiting the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, when she set her GoPro camera down while its was recording. Before she knew it, the camera was being carried away in the mouth of an artsy gull. Once the bird was a safe distance away, it set the camera down and recorded some beautiful footage of itself flying away into the sunset.
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How to Shoot Great Sunrise Photography

In this video from Master Photo Workshops photographer Jim Zuckerman shows you how he creates his iconic sunrise photography, using a beautiful lighthouse as his subject. He begins with the basics of choosing your subject and exposure well and then continues on to explain the need to move quickly, “work the scene,” and understand that auto white balance works against you in sunrise and sunset scenes.

The information is straightforward, maybe even basic, but it leads to some amazing photos.

(via ISO1200)

Cross Photos Showing the First and Last Light of the Winter Solstice

Starting in 2001, photographer Mary Mattingly has created an image every year on the winter solstice — the day of the year when daylight is shortest — showing the first light of the day and the last light of the day blended into a single photo. The series is called “First Light / Last Light“.
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Calculate Your Local Golden Hour

The golden hour in photography is the first or last hour of sunlight in a day that photographers often aim to shoot in, since the sun’s position produces a soft and warm light with longer shadows. The Golden Hour Calculator is a useful website that can help you calculate the golden hour(s) for your location, telling you exactly when the sun rises and sets.

The Golden Hour Calculator (via Reddit)


Update: Darkness is an app for the iPhone that can help you calculate your golden hours on the go. (thx @noahaboussafy)

Silhouette Photographs at Dusk

Dusk is a really interesting time to take photographs, when the sun begins to turn the sky reddish orange. If you use the faint light in the horizon as a backdrop, you can get really interesting silhouette photographs of people and landscapes.

All you need to do is expose based on the sky. If you have a point and shoot, just aim at the sky, hold down the shutter halfway to lock the exposure based on the sky, and then recompose the shot.

Here’s a scene where I exposed based on the subjects in the foreground. Since the difference between the foreground and the sky is so great, properly exposing the foreground causes the sky to be completely blown out.

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Exposing based on the sky produces this look:

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My favorite from this particular evening:

DSC00527 (print)

To capture motion without significant blur, you’ll need to use a somewhat fast shutter speed. In this case the shutter speed was 1/50 of a second, but there was still some blur (look at some of the feet).

That’s it though. It’s pretty simple. Good luck.


A photograph like this involving a basketball player dunking on a hoop would be pretty epic.

If you can think of any other scenarios or activities that would create cool silhouette photographs, leave a comment!